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Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby undeadmonkey » August 9th, 2018, 1:34 pm

I agree with all except for Thor. Ragnarock was hilarious
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby numbersix » August 9th, 2018, 2:24 pm

Thor WAS hilarious at times, but it's clear Taika didn't give a damn about the plot and the villain and got bored with that aspect. Basiclaly once they left Jeff Goldblum the film got dreary.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Chienfantome » August 11th, 2018, 1:55 pm

It's been a while since I last reviewed a film here, but I've seen a film that I need to tell you about.

So yesterday night I saw Under the Silver Lake, David Robert Mitchell's eagerly awaited third film, notably following "It Follows".
So here's a film I can't wait to watch again, because it is so dense, so curious, so unexpected, that it is one of those films that will grow on me with time, and that each viewer will see something more in it with each new viewing.
Andrew Garfield plays Sam, a Los Angeles slacker, who spends his time in his flat doing nothing much. He is fascinated by one of his neighbours, a gorgeous blond who suddenly flirts with him one night... before completely vanishing the next day. Sam cannot believe she just moved out overnight, and starts investigating to try and discover what might have happened to her.
What follows is a modern labyrinthical adventure through the mythology of Los Angeles, and Hollywood, but also through today's America, Trump's America, the extremism, the conspiracy theorists. But deep down it is perhaps most of all a moving film about heartbreaks, and how it unsettles, and changes, one's point of view and place in society. It's fascinating, it's unsettling, it's almost scary sometimes. The film clearly owes a lot to Lynch, and Mulholland Drive in particular.
A very, very interesting film.
8.5/10
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 11th, 2018, 3:57 pm

Christopher Robin 8/10

Winnie the Pooh gets the Hook treatment and the end result is a beautifully shot (with some scenes in 65mm) film with excellent visual effects and a feel that's more or less an Americanized Paddington (the film even has a pair of Paddington connections: Peter Capaldi voices Rabbit while Paddington 2 co-writer Simon Farnaby makes an appearance as a cab driver). Though the film is called Christopher Robin and focuses on him trying to regain his childhood memories, you really came here for Pooh and his friends and they don't disappoint. In fact, the concept of seeing them in the real world and being able to interact with other people is a really interesting concept (in most films, you have a complicated set of rules that ask more questions than answer) and it creates for some humor that's perfectly in line with the Disney interpretation of A.A. Milne's characters.

Though it might be seen as too wholesome, it's Winnie the Pooh. Being warm and fuzzy is what the series is all about.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby numbersix » August 11th, 2018, 7:06 pm

Chien: sold!
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Ron Burgundy » August 12th, 2018, 10:14 pm

I'll 2nd that, very keen to go see Under the Silver Lake on the ze big screen.

I watched 2 biopics yesterday;

Chappaquidick
A story of Ted Kennedy or to be more precise, the happenings in the days just after the "disapperance" of Mary Jo Kop. It was definately a challenging film to watch as you are forced to become empathetic towards the central character, Kennedy who has massive expectation put upon him after the deaths of his famous siblings. Jason Clarke does well in taking on a difficult role but never really excels because of the depressing subject matter and lack of range thanks mostly to the script. Also of note is the disgraceful unabashed behavior of the senior political staff called upon by Kennedy Sr, the good ol American way, doing virtually anything to cover things up to save the image of Ted. Only the close friend and cousin played by Ed Helms has any sentiment of integrity. Not bad but not good either.
5/10

I, Tonya
A very different film to the one above^, this was way better. Im sure you've all heard what this was about, what made it fascinating is that A) i'd never heard on Tonya Harding and B) it was a pretty crazy true story. It starts off as a portyal of Tonya and her redneck lifestyle, transcending stereotypes and blossoming into a terrific ice figure skater and then somewhere in the middle the plot device is thrown in: the sabotage of her greatest rival. At times the film is electric and some wonderful direction and cinematography is done, just the pace is a little unorganised, which at times goes from breakneck to snail. Still, good performance from Margot Robbie (and so too Sebastien Stan and Allison Janney) drives the show to keep things entertaining.
6.5/10
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby W » August 13th, 2018, 9:04 am

I liked that Chappaquiddick was so level. It didn't pull any punches, but it didn't go out of it's way to pound him into the ground either. It could have easily went down on of the infinite Kennedy conspiracy theories or became super apologetic, but did neither. His (lack of) actions were horrendous in itself and his privilege was easily seen without molding the truth to what you want it to be. I thought Clarke was pretty good in the role myself. You could see his inner monologue written on his face throughout the film.

That said, it was a pretty average low-to-medium budget Hollywood biopic.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 18th, 2018, 5:13 pm

Leave No Trace 7/10

Difficult but ultimately rewarding drama about an ex-marine and his daughter living off the grid in Portland. After being forced from their home, the two begin to realize that civilization is too much for them and seek surroundings much like their old place. It's a slow starter but once you understand the characters and their actions, you know why they are who they are. Debra Granik doesn't take sides and rather than make the characters cheap paranoid lunatics or faceless bureaucrats (in the case of the social workers), they are all sympathetic figures. The film is kind of like another Bleecker Street release, Captain Fantastic, but not as good (and this one isn't a comedy). The star of the piece is easily the girl who played Tom, who reminded me of the girl from The Killing of a Sacred Deer.

In short, it's much improved from the overpraised and then forgotten Winter's Bone.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby numbersix » August 23rd, 2018, 9:57 am

Two good films!

American Animals: 7/10
A great exploration of a heist, told from the perspective of vulnerable young men. The movie mixes documentary and fiction, as the narrative of how a heist of a valuable book took place, while the actual people tell their sides of the story, which sometimes clashes with each other. What could have been a cold, cerebral examination of truth and lies actually finds a deeper footing in its protrayal of the excitement and terror of breaking the law. Both the characters and the actual people involve display their nerves before and during the event, giving us more insight into how it must actually feel than any other heist movie.

Cold War: 7/10
Pawel Pawlikowskia follows up Ida with another stripped-down, black and white Polish film. This time, it's a love story inspired by his parents, set during post war Poland as it turns into a fully communist state. A music composer sets off to find village folk to sing local music in celebration of the nation, and falls for a talented but wild young woman. The film follows them as they fall for each other and try to escape the country when they realise the dictatorial nature of Communism. The film is told with simplicity, and while at times the relationship between the couple is coldly presented, the film finds colour and warmth in the music that ties them together. A moving, beautifully shot film.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 26th, 2018, 6:39 pm

Puzzle 8/10

This could have been a disaster, being a film about a possibly disabled mother who becomes obsessed with puzzles and uses it as her own personal awakening, directed by a producer whose last film was never released, and shot entirely with natural light. But somehow, it all works thanks to Kelly Macdonald's performance and subtle direction that is more intimate than most Sundance films. Though the film was promoted as this crowd-pleasing feel good story, it's really not as the heart of the story is focused more on Macdonald's need to break out of her shell and fix the issues going on with her falling apart family. The puzzles are basically a metaphor and Sony did a poor job of pushing this aspect.

I'm going to have seen the original 2009 version of the story to see if it's similar or different. Seeing how the director of the original produced the remake, I wouldn't be surprised to see the two be alike in some way.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby JohnErle » August 27th, 2018, 1:20 pm

Support The Girls – 7/10

In the course of one crazy, hectic day, the manager of a Hooters-type restaurant runs herself ragged trying to deal with the myriad problems that pop up both on the job and in the personal lives of her staff. Regina Hall is easy to root for, but the unintended irony of the story is that her character is a wonderful den mother and loyal friend, but a pretty lousy manager, and the decision she makes at the end of the film will only make her life worse, not better. Yes, the service industry is hell, but the choices these characters make are more self-destructive than empowering.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 28th, 2018, 8:35 pm

The Happytime Murders 2/10

Brian Henson's attempt at combining Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Meet the Feebles alternately tries way too hard and not hard enough. The film wants to try for a message but Zootopia already did the whole interspecies racism plotline well. The raunchy puppets shtick was already done by American filmmakers well as Team America: World Police. And the running gag about sugar being an underground drug is more or less a lift from Alien Nation's idea that aliens drink sour milk like alcohol. So what is this failed attempt at a new cult film left with? It's a generic Lethal Weapon retread where Mel Gibson's now a puppet and Danny Glover is played by Melissa McCarthy. You've pretty much seen it all before and done better than in this laugh-free film that took years to get made (and you can easily see why studios were so hesitant to make it).

The one positive is that the puppetry is very good but there's nothing to go with the tireless efforts of the puppeteers. Jim Henson was good with a story. Brian without his father's creations hits a creative wall immediately.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby undeadmonkey » August 29th, 2018, 1:38 pm

We went to go see The Meg yesterday. If you have trouble letting go of logic, you wont like this movie. Otherwise it was an enjoyable 2 hours of people getting eaten by sharks. ;)
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » September 1st, 2018, 5:08 pm

BlacKkKlansman 10/10

The most terrifying, as well as the most important, film this year. Though the trailers strangely sold this as a comedy (probably because Detroit flopped and Jordan Peele produced this one), it's in fact Spike Lee's best film in years and an example where his political viewpoints fit perfectly with the material shown (it's also rather subtle in places outside of the bookends). Though the story takes in early 1970's Colorado, it has so much to do with the US now. And much of the premise is still happening today, only it's a lot more vocal.

The acting is very strong but for me, the real standouts were in the editing and score. I hope this film gets some Oscar nominations but the summer release combined with the Academy's conservatism seems to hurt its chances. Which is too bad as it's sure to have more impact than another inspirational spaceman movie or an actor directing himself.

I feel like describing the film would give away too much so I'm going to leave it up to the rest to see it for themselves.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Shrykespeare » September 2nd, 2018, 11:13 pm

Crazy Rich Asians 8/10

I honestly had no plans to see this movie, but my Asian wife heard from her Asian friends that it was great. And they were right. This was an absolutely delightful movie about a young Asian couple who travels from NYC to Singapore, where the rich boyfriend much introduce his Chinese-American girlfriend to his very rich, very traditional Asian mother and grandmother.

There are many sweet moments, many laugh-out-loud moments (Ken Jeong has a funny cameo), and Awkwafina (hot off Ocean's 8) is hysterical.

I highly recommend this film.
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