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Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby undeadmonkey » August 9th, 2018, 1:34 pm

I agree with all except for Thor. Ragnarock was hilarious
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby numbersix » August 9th, 2018, 2:24 pm

Thor WAS hilarious at times, but it's clear Taika didn't give a damn about the plot and the villain and got bored with that aspect. Basiclaly once they left Jeff Goldblum the film got dreary.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Chienfantome » August 11th, 2018, 1:55 pm

It's been a while since I last reviewed a film here, but I've seen a film that I need to tell you about.

So yesterday night I saw Under the Silver Lake, David Robert Mitchell's eagerly awaited third film, notably following "It Follows".
So here's a film I can't wait to watch again, because it is so dense, so curious, so unexpected, that it is one of those films that will grow on me with time, and that each viewer will see something more in it with each new viewing.
Andrew Garfield plays Sam, a Los Angeles slacker, who spends his time in his flat doing nothing much. He is fascinated by one of his neighbours, a gorgeous blond who suddenly flirts with him one night... before completely vanishing the next day. Sam cannot believe she just moved out overnight, and starts investigating to try and discover what might have happened to her.
What follows is a modern labyrinthical adventure through the mythology of Los Angeles, and Hollywood, but also through today's America, Trump's America, the extremism, the conspiracy theorists. But deep down it is perhaps most of all a moving film about heartbreaks, and how it unsettles, and changes, one's point of view and place in society. It's fascinating, it's unsettling, it's almost scary sometimes. The film clearly owes a lot to Lynch, and Mulholland Drive in particular.
A very, very interesting film.
8.5/10
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 11th, 2018, 3:57 pm

Christopher Robin 8/10

Winnie the Pooh gets the Hook treatment and the end result is a beautifully shot (with some scenes in 65mm) film with excellent visual effects and a feel that's more or less an Americanized Paddington (the film even has a pair of Paddington connections: Peter Capaldi voices Rabbit while Paddington 2 co-writer Simon Farnaby makes an appearance as a cab driver). Though the film is called Christopher Robin and focuses on him trying to regain his childhood memories, you really came here for Pooh and his friends and they don't disappoint. In fact, the concept of seeing them in the real world and being able to interact with other people is a really interesting concept (in most films, you have a complicated set of rules that ask more questions than answer) and it creates for some humor that's perfectly in line with the Disney interpretation of A.A. Milne's characters.

Though it might be seen as too wholesome, it's Winnie the Pooh. Being warm and fuzzy is what the series is all about.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby numbersix » August 11th, 2018, 7:06 pm

Chien: sold!
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Ron Burgundy » August 12th, 2018, 10:14 pm

I'll 2nd that, very keen to go see Under the Silver Lake on the ze big screen.

I watched 2 biopics yesterday;

Chappaquidick
A story of Ted Kennedy or to be more precise, the happenings in the days just after the "disapperance" of Mary Jo Kop. It was definately a challenging film to watch as you are forced to become empathetic towards the central character, Kennedy who has massive expectation put upon him after the deaths of his famous siblings. Jason Clarke does well in taking on a difficult role but never really excels because of the depressing subject matter and lack of range thanks mostly to the script. Also of note is the disgraceful unabashed behavior of the senior political staff called upon by Kennedy Sr, the good ol American way, doing virtually anything to cover things up to save the image of Ted. Only the close friend and cousin played by Ed Helms has any sentiment of integrity. Not bad but not good either.
5/10

I, Tonya
A very different film to the one above^, this was way better. Im sure you've all heard what this was about, what made it fascinating is that A) i'd never heard on Tonya Harding and B) it was a pretty crazy true story. It starts off as a portyal of Tonya and her redneck lifestyle, transcending stereotypes and blossoming into a terrific ice figure skater and then somewhere in the middle the plot device is thrown in: the sabotage of her greatest rival. At times the film is electric and some wonderful direction and cinematography is done, just the pace is a little unorganised, which at times goes from breakneck to snail. Still, good performance from Margot Robbie (and so too Sebastien Stan and Allison Janney) drives the show to keep things entertaining.
6.5/10
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby W » August 13th, 2018, 9:04 am

I liked that Chappaquiddick was so level. It didn't pull any punches, but it didn't go out of it's way to pound him into the ground either. It could have easily went down on of the infinite Kennedy conspiracy theories or became super apologetic, but did neither. His (lack of) actions were horrendous in itself and his privilege was easily seen without molding the truth to what you want it to be. I thought Clarke was pretty good in the role myself. You could see his inner monologue written on his face throughout the film.

That said, it was a pretty average low-to-medium budget Hollywood biopic.
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Re: Rate That Movie Part IV: Movies Never Sleep

Postby Buscemi2 » August 18th, 2018, 5:13 pm

Leave No Trace 7/10

Difficult but ultimately rewarding drama about an ex-marine and his daughter living off the grid in Portland. After being forced from their home, the two begin to realize that civilization is too much for them and seek surroundings much like their old place. It's a slow starter but once you understand the characters and their actions, you know why they are who they are. Debra Granik doesn't take sides and rather than make the characters cheap paranoid lunatics or faceless bureaucrats (in the case of the social workers), they are all sympathetic figures. The film is kind of like another Bleecker Street release, Captain Fantastic, but not as good (and this one isn't a comedy). The star of the piece is easily the girl who played Tom, who reminded me of the girl from The Killing of a Sacred Deer.

In short, it's much improved from the overpraised and then forgotten Winter's Bone.
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