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Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Leestu » February 22nd, 2011, 12:19 am

It's taken all the way to #3 but finally a day where I have seen every movie picked. I have been so close so many times. For about the last 3 weeks there has always been at least one I haven't seen (which have all gone on my queue) and usually only the one.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 22nd, 2011, 3:02 am

Okay, people, we have come to the end of the road, or at least as far as I am concerned (for the most part). Starting on Thursday, 2/24, silversurfer will be presenting his #1 film, followed by NSpan, JohnErle, and a day off for the Oscars, followed by Banks, Barca, W, Ron B, Buscemi, leestu, Six, Geezer, Chien, thegreenarrow, ozzy, UDM, transformers and myself.


MOVIE #2


Shrykespeare

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
– Directors: Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam; starring Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Michael Palin, Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam. Believe it or not, the first time I ever saw this film was over a two-day period in my freshman Religion class in high school. (I went to a Catholic high school despite not being Catholic.) My teacher was a tremendous Python fan, and he turned me into one on the spot, because thenceforth I became hooked on every episode of The Flying Circus that I could view on PBS. And while I didn’t love all the other Python movies nearly as much, The Holy Grail remains, to this day, the funniest goddamn movie I have ever seen. From the opening credits (“A moose once bit my sister”… “those responsible have been sacked”) and the opening scene when you realize they’re only PRETENDING to ride horses (which actually happened because their limited budget wouldn’t allow for horses, so Chapman suggested the coconuts because it would be funnier) to every scene that follows, The Holy Grail is a non-stop laugh riot. One of the most quotable comedies of all time, and one of the most beloved, it is a testament to the longevity and pure awesomeness of Monty Python’s humor. For goodness sakes, this film is older than most of us here, and yet it will be the #1 comedy on our collective list. That says an awful lot. (11th appearance)

French taunting: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9V7zbWNznbs


silversurfer

Edward Scissorhands (1990)
- Director: Tim Burton; starring Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Diane Wiest, Alan Arkin and Anthony Michael Hall. Without doubt the absolute greatest fairytale ever put onto screen, Edward Scissorhands is a tragic, delicate fable which I have cherished since it's initial release when I was lucky enough to see it first hand on the silver screen. It opened up a world of fantastical wonder which was so rare, one which captured my imagination like a bolt of lightning to my head, charming me with it's visual style and illuminating characters. The story of a man who is both creative and destructive, a character who wants to touch but can't, I suppose it connected with me as a kid who had real difficulty with relationships and my inability to communicate (I know, I know, you'd have never guessed...) with others, and maybe this touched others in a similar way too. Burton was able to translate many of my feelings, as a quiet guy who didn't really fit into most conventional stereotypes, straight onto film. This beautiful reworking of Frankenstein, an unfinished creation of an inventor who is removed from his lonely existence by an Avon lady and finds himself living with her family in a pastel coloured suburbia rife with gossip and conformity is so delicately sumptuous, and yet tragic at the same time. Burton crafted a visually stunning and romantic movie which was both personal to him and Depp, and Johnny managed to instill an honesty and innocence so superbly visualized despite his lack of vocabulary and 'freakish' appearance. He became a character you cared for, a character you became attached to, and a character you feel a real sadness for once the neighbours turn on him. Complementing the movie is a haunting score from Danny Elfman, and it's one which is immediately recognizable and instantly consuming, delicately skirting around both a romanticism and tragedy, themes which were so prevalent in the movie. I think this is Burton's masterpiece, he has never created anything even close to this, and I doubt he ever will again. It's a once in a lifetime work of art, a movie which is timeless, relatable and truly fantastical, and it's one I return to again and again. (5th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eq2PPFUhfpo


thegreenarrow

Brief Encounter (1945)
- Director: David Lean; starring Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard and Stanley Holloway. As the steam of the train throws a speck of grit into Celia Johnson's eye and Trevor Howard whisks her into the nearby tea room, so begins the most romantic story of all time. Brief Encounter's storyline is simple, one a married woman who meets a stranger and falls in love, however, this belies the complexity of the emotions involved. It's a story of an illicit love which is impossible, but it is an extremely moving, exquisitely acted film which draws you in with its romantic charm and painful tragedy, as two people with the ideal chemistry fight social constrictions for their love. The entire action of this intimate chamber piece is so delicately handled, as the couple share their tenderness with a lyricism and poetry despite the most seemingly mundane act. Their passion is restrained, avoiding the crude pitfalls of modern romances, instead focusing on the obvious affection between the two, and Lean demonstrates this heartbreaking passion with a sublime touch, and the intensity is further heightened using the stark use of black and white, as shadows and light focus their affection. The story is told in a first person narrative, as Johnson battles between her head and her heart, trying to decide between the fantastical ideals of the affair with the mundanity of her married life. But while the romanticism is so passionately consuming, their is some fine humour added to the drama. One scene, in which Johnson is fraught with thoughts over the potential affair, bumps into a busy body she knows who won't stop talking to her. She thinks in her head; "I wish you'd stop talking. I wish you'd stop prying and trying to find things out. I wish you were dead - no I don't mean that. That was silly and unkind. But I wish you'd stop talking". It so eloquently portrays her agitation, while also highlighting her need to do the right thing, and it is so charming to see. Also in comedic support are Joyce Carey and Stanley Holloway, a couple of staff at the station who constantly gossip and flirt with each other, and it's a delight to see such drama. This may not be as epic in scale as some of Lean's later works, but I think the intimate scale of the movie makes it all the more consuming, a heartbreaking tale of forbidden love and one which is unlikely ever to be challenged as the greatest romantic movie of all time. (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0CosTboBz8


transformers

Sin City (2005)
- Director: Robert Rodriguez; starring Bruce Willis, Jessica Alba, Clive Owen, Mickey Rourke, Benecio Del Toro, Rosario Dawson and Nick Stahl. Sin City is the standard for comic book films. How it is able to handle the 3 equally fantastic storylines blows my mind. Each story with Marv, Dwight and Hartigan are entertaining, badass and insanely well written. The all-star cast is beyond impressive. Everybody bring their A-game and I think this might be the most impressive cast ever assembled. It's engrossing and captures the comic book vibe to perfection. The absolute definition of a game changer when it comic-book films and everything else pales in comparison. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5zgg3WCiWk


englishozzy

The Matrix (1999)
- Director: Andy & Larry Wachowski; starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving. The Wachowskis had brought something original and game-changing to the table when this was released back in 1999. What I witnessed at the cinemas that day was the greatest sci-fi movie of all time. With the brilliant use of 'flo mo' and some awesome technical battle sequences I was blown away with what I was watching. There may be arguments about the ridiculous plot but for me, the idea of watching a film is to planted into something a million miles away from real life and get lost for a couple of hours in the marvel on the big screen. (11th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM5yepZ21pI


Ron Burgundy

Fight Club (1999)
- Director: David Fincher; starring Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, Helena Bonham Carter, Zach Grenier, Jared Leto and Meat Loaf. This movie almost made my number 1, and even eclipsed Pulp Fiction for the number 2 spot. Why? Well because David Fincher is a genius, that’s why. The dark and brooding atmosphere he created here is paired with some real special twists and turns. I love it how Fincher put in the brief sample of Brad Pitts Tyler Durden into Edward Norton’s nameless character, the quick flashes before you are actually introduced to Durden, you know what I mean, how he gets into his head and stuff, I don’t wanna be a spoiler. It has a good cast too, Norton being as good as he can be, Pitt pretty much stealing the show in almost every scene, Meat Loaf with man-boobs and the lucky but talented Jared Leto (he’s appeared in several great movies but he’s pretty much given up on acting to focus on his band), with Helena Bonham Carter putting in a non-Burton role here, doing good too. The plot is excellent and the ending is one of the best in recent history. (10th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QgFWXLN-ug


Buscemi

Star Wars: A New Hope (1977)
- Director: George Lucas; starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Alec Guinness, and James Earl Jones. The original and still the best of the original Star Wars trilogy. Sure, some of the dialogue and the effects (not to mention the changes made in the Special Edition) might have aged some and the prequels may have tainted some good memories but the film is timeless and still packs a major wallop today. The origins story of Luke, Han and Leia is one of the best in cinema and the effects that were created for this film are still great after all these years. Seeing this world unfold on-screen is breathtaking and the filmmakers actually manage to make these worlds look real (you don't get that nowadays with CGI). Though he is a bit of a pariah and scapegoat now (the infamous change in the cantina with Greedo shooting before Han was forced by the MPAA to retain its PG rating), George Lucas made a masterpiece and it's no surprise that it became his lifeblood. (6th appearance, including each of the last four days)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gvqpFbRKtQ


Chienfantome

In the Mood for Love (2000)
– Director: Wong Kar Wai, starring Tony Leung Chiu Wai and Maggie Cheung. There are iconic moments in the life of a film lover. The first film seen. The first film without the parents. The first film on your own. In the Mood for Love marked a turning point for me. I was barely 19, and already an avid moviegoer when Wong Kar Wai’s splendor was released. But I lacked motivation to go see it. I was still much into a comfort zone consisting of American and French films, with a few occasional exceptions as long as it offered action, adventure or mystery. But a Chinese film about a man and a woman falling in love but repressing their feelings in 1960’s Hong Kong wasn’t really my thing. I went to my local multiplex to see Charlie’s Angels that day. But I had read the show times wrong, and the only movie I hadn’t seen playing at that hour was In the Mood for Love. So I went. And so it changed my life. Well, I guess one day or another, a foreign film would have had that impact on me, eventually, but that role went to In the mood for love. Suddenly, I realized that a Chinese film without much talk, without much action and without many characters could be a gripping, fascinating and heartbreaking experience. Maybe my love for The Bridges of Madison County helped me fall in love with In the Mood for Love. The ultimate film to conciliate the beauty of feelings, the beauty of the images and the beauty of the sounds. Tony Leung’s melancholy, Maggie Cheung’s grace, those sensual colors, that delicate music, those perfect slow motions… Tony Leung whispering in the ruins of Angkor… Every single detail makes In the mood for love the gracious film it is. (4th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjcTPRkAfL0


numbersix

The Big Lebowski (1998)
- Director: Joel and Ethan Coen; starring Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Julianne Moore and Steve Buscemi. The first Coens film I ever watched in the cinema. I didn’t know quite what to make of it, even after discovering the directors through watching and enjoying Fargo. The Big Lebowski seemed outrageous, silly, offbeat… and odd. But there was something about it that was intriguing, and the more I watched it the more I realized that almost every line is a brilliant joke. The Coens created some of their best characters in this film, from cagey Vietnam Vet Walter, simpleton surfer Donnie, avante garde feminist Maude, the nihilists (”We believe in nothing”), Jackie Treehorn (a reference to Ben Gazzara’s character in The Killing of a Chinese Bookie), Da Fino, and of course the potty-mouth pedophile champion bowler Jesus. I was going to attach a hilarious quote with each one, working from memory (it’s that easy when the quotes are that good) but I’ll let y’all watch and rewatch the movie for those gems. And speaking of characters, I of course need to mention The Dude. What a brilliant character, a throwback to the 60’s who bumbles through life in a haze of pot and White Russian intoxication. He is sad, frustrated, but fascinatingly cool. You laugh at him but want to watch him forever. The Coens combine all these wonderful characters and brilliant sequences into a sort of parody of film noir. It’s a detective story told by a guy who’s the worst detective ever, until we realize there’s nothing to detect in the first place! I love the scene where the Dude is suspicious of Jacki Treehorn as he takes a phone call and writes a message. The Dude, in his only clever moment, uses a pencil to trace over the impression left on the pad- a traditional detective ploy. Only what we get is the drawing of a man with a massive penis. Hilarious in itself, it’s also a deconstruction of the detective genre. And it goes deeper. The film is also typical of the Coens’ most recurring theme. The more you try to make sense of life and control it, the more it spirals out of control. Watch all their films and you’ll see this coming through (even in their adaptation of No Country for Old Men). It’s their life philosophy, and in this film once the Dude stops chilling and tries to do something about the missing Miss Lebowski, his life just ends up as a hilarious disaster. If only he sat back and relaxed. (10th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcMwpWIRQp4


Banks

Leon (The Professional) (1994)
- Director: Luc Besson; starring Jean Reno, Natalie Portman and Gary Oldman. Originally, this was my #9 on the list, but after seeing it appear on everyone’s list, I re-watched it just out of curiousity. And it blew me away once again – it’s fucking fantastic. Jean Reno gives his best performance as an innocent man-child assassin who takes in a too-grown pre-teen played wonderfully by Portman in her first major movie role. Portman and Reno play perfectly off each other, especially when the film starts walking the line of a Lolita vibe. I once read it was a story about two 12-year-olds falling in love, but one happened to be in the body of a 40-year-old man. That’s probably the closest description of Leon. Reno’s devotion to Portman’s character throughout is spellbinding, and their parting moment towards the end is so touching. I remember catching it one sleepless night when I was a teenager, and immediately trying to show it to everyone I knew the next day. It’s a great film, one that you want to share with everyone just so they can experience what you have – a deeply moving and personal film. And Gary Oldman. Fucking perfect. (6th appearance)


Gary Oldman decimates a family: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKjJKbgqf2A


BarcaRulz

Cidade de Deus (aka: City of God) (2002)
- Directors: Fernando Merielles, Katia Lund; starring Alexandre Rodrigues, Matheus Nachtergaele, Leandro Firmino. An absolutely brilliant piece of filmaking that shows you just how dangerous life in the favelas can be. Loosely based on the some actual events, this film shows us how haunting life in the slums of Brazil can be, and what better way to deliver that message than to delve deep in the psyche of the most psychotic person there? The acting is brilliant, especially when you consider that most of the cast had never acted before, and the plot/script are brilliant as well. Top marks go to Fernando Merielles though who pulls it all off with class and delivers my favorite foreign film of all time. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJdW1TevoyA


Geezer

The Dark Knight (2008)
- Director: Christopher Nolan; starring: Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart, Maggie Gyllenhall, Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman. The first movie I ever saw at a midnight showing. The most anticipated film of my life. I was so excited just by the trailer that I was going crazy. And then I saw it, and it was even better than I could have imagined. It is the ultimate film on my favorite superhero. It is the Ultimate comic book movie. The Joker, as played by Heath Ledger, will go down with Darth Vader as the greatest villains of all time. So many scenes just jump out at you. Its an action film, but its smart, which Christopher Nolan has become the master of creating. I've watched it probably 10 times since and it has only faded from my number one movie, to my number two movie. So the drop off, pretty non-existent. It’s just everything I look for in a film, and nothing has really come close since. (6th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y2szViJlaY


leestu

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
– Director Milos Forman; starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, Brad Dourif and Scatman Crothers. Wow! A Jack Nicholson double at 2 and 3. Hadn’t realized that before making this list. But even more surprising is a Scatman Crothers double at 2 and 3. Ha ha ha, never would have thought that. I’m feeling a bit repetitive here but like most of movies in my top 20 I love this movie because of the emotional impact it has on me as a viewer. Also I really hope that everyone who likes this movie has or will read the novel by Ken Kesey. It really is a brilliant novel and tells the story from the Chief’s perspective, instead of McMurphy’s. (4th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jESI8JZUbDQ


W

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
- Director: Milos Forman; starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, and Brad Dourif. If I had to pick the best cast ever, it's going to have to be this film. R.P. McMurphy is a guy that just likes to have some fun and can talk the rest of his guys into just about anything. Jack Nicholson plays this role to a tee. Nurse Ratched is the among the best film villains in film history with her iron fisted rule over the placid psych ward. The battle between these two is truly epic as he tries to rile up the inmates and she tries to make his life miserable. The supporting cast of (at the time, I think) relative unknowns that play the loonies are so much fun. This is easily the best Danny Devito has ever been. Christopher Lloyd's manic turn as Taber rivals his Doc Brown character, for me (and it's supporting). Sidney Lassick's Charley Cheswick is one of the best, especially when he gets into his "I want my cigarettes, Nurse Rached" rant. Brad Dourif got a supporting Oscar nod as Billy, the suicidal youth. And the Native American mountain of a man "Chief" may have done the third best acting job in the film behind the two Oscar winners. A truly magnificent film. (5th appearance)


Cigarettes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5NyyC-UjBM


NSpan

Brazil (1985)
– Director: Terry Gilliam; starring Jonathan Pryce, Robert DeNiro, Katherine Helmond and Michael Palin. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Wh2b1eZFUM


undeadmonkey

Se7en (1995)
- Director: David Fincher; starring Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey. My top two films might seem a bite safe(r), but my top ten picks could switch into any positions and I would be satisfied with it. They are really that close in my appreciation for them. I have had a love-hate relationship with this film a while after first seeing it. I have never been so shocked after the ending of any film. I can usually guess any ending of a twisty movie. Here though I did not only not see it coming, but I was utterly shocked. So I hated it for that, but a part of me loved it for being able to accomplish what it did. Also I figured if it could create such passion in me, it must be great. After a few more viewings, I just came to love it. David Fincher ad his cinematographer Darius Khondji create a visually stunning almost noir dark thriller. There are deep dark places that you can't see into and would probably be afraid to step into, emotionally, mentally and physically. Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt give great performances, and they have great chemistry, I have always wondered why they haven't done another film together. The moral questions asked are intriguing, mainly taken from Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy, and also meant to entertain us, but I would argue to mostly make us think as well. A great tense taut thriller no fluff or loose ends which takes us for a wild ride. (10th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4YV2_TcCoE


JohnErle

Bull Durham (1988)
– Director: Ron Shelton; starring Kevin Costner, Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins and Robert Wuhl. This will always have a special place in my heart because I saw it when I was seriously thinking of making movies as a career and its the first film I ever analyzed in great detail. It wins you over with big laughs, sexual tension, and an insider's look at baseball, but it keeps an undercurrent of sadness never far from the surface and avoids cliche at all times. Profane and poetic, raunchy and romantic, it has the feeling of authenticity you can only get from a writer/director who lived his story. It's my favourite date movie, it's my favourite sports movie, it's been my favourite bromance since long before that term was invented, and it was always the film I mentioned as my all-time favourite whenever anyone asked, but putting together this list I bumped it down one spot for the time in 20 years. I decided that the movie I listed as #1 was more important in the grand scheme of things, but I've never loved a movie quite like I love Bull Durham.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8olTfKZnFiM



So that's it. The end of the second-to-last thread. (The #1s will get their own thread), which I will create some time before surfer's turn on Thursday. I will post the recap of this thread probably tomorrow (Tuesday).
Happy 70th birthday Jeremy Irons! (9/19/18)
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby numbersix » February 22nd, 2011, 4:45 am

Aw.... the last group listing. I've been getting up early in order to post my comments before work, so after this I'm going to have to find something to do in the mornings!

MOVIE #2

Shrykespeare: Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) – One of my favourite comedies ever. Always funny, always clever, always intentionally chaotic just to fuck with people. I can't get enough of it. I'm delighted it's in our collective Top 10

silversurfer: Edward Scissorhands (1990) - A wonderful film that manages to be a moving fairy tale while also being a social satire. One of Burton's best.

thegreenarrow: Brief Encounter (1945) - Ah I knew I'd see this somewhere on your list. And glad to. It's one of the better romance films I've ever seen.

transformers: Sin City (2005) - Hgher up than I'd ever like to see it on anyone'es list, but it's still a mesmerising ultra-violent movie with some unforgettable scenes.

englishozzy: The Matrix (1999) - Not bad, but not for me.

Ron Burgundy: Fight Club (1999) - A popular film indeed. I'm still curious to see what everyone thinks the film is really about, as opposed to how funny the dialogue is, how surprising the twists, how good the acting, etc. A brave movie, I'll give it that, and one with plenty to explore (including blatent homoeroticism) beyond the surface.

Buscemi: Star Wars: A New Hope (1977) - Great fun. I've run out of things to say about this.

Chienfantome: In the Mood for Love (2000) – You're right, this was the film I guessed was your Number 2. I still think I know your Number 1, but we'll see in a few days. A very slight movie in terms of plot, but the atmosphere of spleen is indeed one of the best realised I've ever seen in a film. Amazing music, amazing performances, and it's all about not being able to make that leap. Amazing stuff.

Banks: Leon (The Professional) (1994) - A very good action film. A cut above the rest in many ways. Portman blew me away and it took her 16 years to do it again with her performances in Black Swan.

BarcaRulz: Cidade de Deus (aka: City of God) (2002) - Great pick, Barca. A powerful film with a breath-taking pace and a sense of tragedy.

Geezer: The Dark Knight (2008) - No surprises seeing you pick this. But there's nothing wrong with loving one of the best blockbusters in a long, long time. Just enough smarts to make it more than another vapid comic-book adaptation.

leestu and W: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) – A brilliant drama that deserved all of its awards. Just think of how influential it has become. Makes you think twice about which is crazier, the guys in the institute or the ones who run it.

NSpan: Brazil (1985) – Kinda thought this would be your Number 1 film, which would be cool as it was would be your favourite song AND your favourite film. And if we did a list of Top 10 favourite countries you could make it a triple whammy! Anyway, a brilliant mix of comedy, satire, and sci-fi. Love it.

undeadmonkey: Se7en (1995) - A brilliant thriller that can be rewatched despte its twist.

JohnErle: Bull Durham (1988) – Never seen it. I should really do so.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Chienfantome » February 22nd, 2011, 5:04 am

I guess you can have guessed which is my #1, Six, you know enough of my tastes, yes.
And I guessed right about your #2. Now, which is your #1... good question, I'll need to take another look at your whole Top to see which is missing ;)
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Leestu » February 22nd, 2011, 8:23 am

numbersix wrote:Ron Burgundy: Fight Club (1999) - A popular film indeed. I'm still curious to see what everyone thinks the film is really about, as opposed to how funny the dialogue is, how surprising the twists, how good the acting, etc. A brave movie, I'll give it that, and one with plenty to explore (including blatent homoeroticism) beyond the surface.



Okay you've asked enough times someone should answer you. I think there is so much going on in this film (including the homoeroticism you mentioned - although I wouldn't call it blatant) that I would need to see it more times than I have to get a lot more of it, but here is a very brief summary of what I took from it after the first couple of viewings. I am self-aware enough to know that I may not be right but that's what I like about some movies - we can all get our own interpretations that may even differ wildly from the creators intentions. I see it as a statement about modern society and about how mind-numbing it can be, especially a humdrum 9 to 5 job with every day the same. We need to be able to feel things to feel alive. I wouldn't recommend it of course but the physical violence for The Narrator and others is their way of actually feeling something, getting their emotions going. As to Tyler Durden, The Narrator knows that he needs to change his life and get out of the rut he's stuck in, but like a lot of people he can't or won't, so disassociating himself he lets Tyler do it for him. Tyler can do all the (risky/reckless?) things The Narrator is too timid (or whatever) to do. As to the ending I see it as a positive ending that says something along the lines of violence is not the solution to the problems of society and the world but love can be a solution to our personal dissatisfaction with life. That may be a strangely soppy interpretation of the ending for a movie like this but I can be a bit sentimental at times and I believe we bring a lot of ourselves to a movie viewing experience.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby numbersix » February 22nd, 2011, 8:30 am

Interesting, Leetsu, and thanks for taking the time to give me your interpretation. What you say seems right, though I'm not sure I'm confrotable with a film that suggests we need violence to feel alive and then subsequently to feel love. Is love a byproduct of violence? And of course is it love from HB Carter's side when it's portrayed as extreme sexual practices? Part of me loves the film and part of me thinks it brings up too many issues it can't resolve.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Leestu » February 22nd, 2011, 9:46 am

#2

Shrykespeare: Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) – I never would have expected this to appear so many times but thrilled it has. Didn't know that about the coconuts and I am now glad they had a limited budget as it is so much funnier that way than it would have been with real horses.

silversurfer: Edward Scissorhands (1990) - I loved this film when it first came out but that is the only time I have seen it. I am just guessing but I reckon if I had seen it a few more times, or even just once but more recently than 21 years ago, that it might have made my list.

thegreenarrow: Brief Encounter (1945) - Haven't seen it but it is now top 5 in my quickflix queue, so hopefully will do soon.

transformers: Sin City (2005) - I had heard so many good things about this film long before I ever saw it that I think I ended up feeling a bit let down. I still thought it was a very good movie just not a fantastic movie, but I do own it and think it's good enough for a rewatch one day.

englishozzy: The Matrix (1999) - A good movie that I really enjoyed but never close to being a favourite of mine.

Ron Burgundy: Fight Club (1999) - An excellent movie that I would watch anytime and probably get something new from every time. This is the sixth movie of yours from this thread alone that also made my list. Not bad considering there was only 13 from your first 90 picks.

Buscemi: Star Wars: A New Hope (1977) - I think I must be one of the very few people that had the opportunity to see this in the cinema as an impressionable young child and not fall in love with it. Don't get me wrong, it is a very good movie that I enjoyed a lot both then and the many times I have seen it since (my best mate growing up loved the original trilogy so we watched them all heaps of times), and I will make sure my kids watch them (so far they have only seen the first two), but it just isn't, and never was, what I would call a favourite. Very strange I know!

Chienfantome: In the Mood for Love (2000) – I must get around to seeing this, and it might be soon, because unless/until there is someone's number one choice that I haven't seen I have placed this at the very top of my queue.

Six: The Big Lebowski (1998) - I am going to watch this movie again very soon because I have only seen it once when it first came out and I thought it was good but not special. However that was before I started really admiring the Coen brothers, and truth be told I felt the same way about Fargo and Barton Fink the first time I saw those. But with those two I ended up seeing them a few more times and every time I watched them I liked them more and more. So much so that Fargo just missed the cut (finishing in the 101-110 range) and Barton Fink made it. I suspect The Big Lebowski may be the same in that the more I watch it the more I'll like it (as you seem to suggestin your intro). Anyway I am looking forward to finding out if that is the case.

Banks: Leon (The Professional) (1994) - Excellent movie that made my list in the earlier stages of the countdown.

BarcaRulz: Cidade de Deus (aka: City of God) (2002) - A movie that I hadn't seen until after this countdown started but absolutely blew me away. Out of all the films that I have seen since this countdown started because they have been on someone's list this is the one I have been the most impressed with. Awesome stuff.

Geezer: The Dark Knight (2008) - I have never really liked any of the Batman movies that I have seen (or many superhero movies at all really) and I didn't really like this one either. Except for Heath Ledgers Joker performance. That was pretty impressive. But hey, that's just me. I can still see why it's held in such high regard by others even if I don't.

W: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) –Glad to see someone else appreciates just how good this movie is. You have much better taste in dramas than you do in comedies W. ;)

NSpan: Brazil (1985) – I too was expecting to see this as your number one pick. Fantastic movie that in case you missed it made my list at approximately the halfway stage.

undeadmonkey: Se7en (1995) - The sixth movie from the number 2's that also made my list. Excellent pick that I always look forward to watching again.

JohnErle: Bull Durham (1988) - I had no interest in watching this when it was released (sports movies generally aren't my cup of tea even though I do watch a lot of sport), however due to the good things I heard about it and based on the recommendation of a friend whose movie tastes I trust I did watch it and quite enjoyed it. Haven't seen it in a looooong time but, so don't really remember details, just that I liked it much more than I expected.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Leestu » February 22nd, 2011, 10:15 am

numbersix wrote:Interesting, Leetsu, and thanks for taking the time to give me your interpretation. What you say seems right, though I'm not sure I'm confrotable with a film that suggests we need violence to feel alive and then subsequently to feel love. Is love a byproduct of violence? And of course is it love from HB Carter's side when it's portrayed as extreme sexual practices? Part of me loves the film and part of me thinks it brings up too many issues it can't resolve.


I didn't mean to suggest that one leads to another, rather that both are ways of feeling alive - one as a negative way (violence/self harm/drugs) and one as a positive way (love for another).Or is it metaphorically saying that you may need to risk being hurt to take a chance at finding happiness? (now I'm just thinking on the spot rather than discussing a well thought out theory :roll: ). I actually see the film as anti-violence. In the end doesn't The Narrator reject these methods?

part of me thinks it brings up too many issues it can't resolve.


I think I agree! :lol:
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Geezer » February 22nd, 2011, 10:31 am

Leestu wrote:
numbersix wrote:Ron Burgundy: Fight Club (1999) - A popular film indeed. I'm still curious to see what everyone thinks the film is really about, as opposed to how funny the dialogue is, how surprising the twists, how good the acting, etc. A brave movie, I'll give it that, and one with plenty to explore (including blatent homoeroticism) beyond the surface.



Okay you've asked enough times someone should answer you. I think there is so much going on in this film (including the homoeroticism you mentioned - although I wouldn't call it blatant) that I would need to see it more times than I have to get a lot more of it, but here is a very brief summary of what I took from it after the first couple of viewings. I am self-aware enough to know that I may not be right but that's what I like about some movies - we can all get our own interpretations that may even differ wildly from the creators intentions. I see it as a statement about modern society and about how mind-numbing it can be, especially a humdrum 9 to 5 job with every day the same. We need to be able to feel things to feel alive. I wouldn't recommend it of course but the physical violence for The Narrator and others is their way of actually feeling something, getting their emotions going. As to Tyler Durden, The Narrator knows that he needs to change his life and get out of the rut he's stuck in, but like a lot of people he can't or won't, so disassociating himself he lets Tyler do it for him. Tyler can do all the (risky/reckless?) things The Narrator is too timid (or whatever) to do.


This is pretty much what I got from the film too. I cut out what you said about the ending because I didn't really get that feeling. I think the ending is merely The Narrator's realization that he has taken his fantasies too far, and they have taken over his life to such a point where he can no longer support his alter ego, and must reign himself back in, even if it is a little too late. He had spiraled so far out of control that he needed to regain a sense of who he is. He seems at peace by the time it is all over and ready to continue his life. Above all else, I believe the film is about liberation from the mundane life. In other words, you gotta get busy living, or get busy dying. This film is about the transformation from the latter to the former.

But very well said Leestu
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby numbersix » February 22nd, 2011, 12:01 pm

Interesting, Geez. So do you think there's a point earlier in the film where Ed Norton's character has indeed found a good and successful means of liberation from domesticity (say, the establishment of the fight club) and that if had maintained that and not progessed further Norton would have found satisfaction, or do you think the events going out of control was something that always HAD to happen? I'm not setting anyone up for a disagreement, I just really want to see what the films means to everyone.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Chienfantome » February 22nd, 2011, 4:35 pm

Wow, we are already are at #2. It flew by so quickly. Okay, here we go.

Shryke - Holy Grail
I would have never guessed this would end up being so loved, so cited, and so high in our collective Top. It's a wonderful surprise, as this is such a unique comedy filled with unforgettable lines and characters, and run by a sense of absurd irresistible.

Surfer - Edward Scissorhands
This is Burton's absolute best film by far for me. A moment of high cinematographic poetry, and a favourite of mine too.

Arrow - Brief Encounter
I will most definitely catch it as soon as possible, preferably in theater if I can.

transformers - Sin City
A fascinating variation on the noir genre. Great stories, great characters. Great film.

Ozzy - The Matrix
A tripping fantasy highly rewatchable. Its power of fascination is strong.

Ron B - Fight Club
I really need to watch it again. It made such a high impression on me when I saw it in theater, and even when I rewatched on DVD. But it's been way too long. Crazy film.

Buscemi - Star Wars
Again, of course. ANd I still adore it, of course. Still one of the greatest, of course.

Six - The Big Lebowski
I'm not surprised to see this fiml appear so high in your Top, Six. I sensed it in your comments ;) How many films can reveal so many new layers and new greatness at each viewing ? Not that much. That's it, I want to watch it again !

Banks - Leon
Sometimes highly watchable, sometimes incredibly boring. Right now I don't like it that much. Who knows what I'll think at the next viewing...

Barca - City of God
And I still haven't seen it. Damn.

Geezer - The Dark Knight
Definitely one of the very best superhero film, if not THE. A complex and rich story, solid characters, amazing performance(s). No wonder it's that popular.

leestu & W
Who knew you two would have the same #, huh ? ;) A great film I haven't seen in 15 years or so. I need to rewatch it !

NSpan - Brazil
Just like Cuckoo, a wonderful film I haven't seen in 15 years or so. I need to rewatch it !

UDM - Seven
I'm glad Fincher is popular over here, even if I haven't cited him that much myself. An atmospheric thriller many times imitated, but almost every time for pale films. Amazing.

JohnE - Bull Durham
I've never seen it, but I'm very curious about it.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 22nd, 2011, 5:13 pm

Movie #2

NSpan, given what your #1 song was, it's no surprise that Brazil was this high on your list.


Buscemi - Star Wars
Geezer - The Dark Knight

Both in my Top Ten. (10/10)

Banks - The Professional - Top 20. (10/10)

englishozzy - The Matrix - Top 30. (10/10)

undeadmonkey - Se7en - Top 40. (10/10)

transformers - Sin City - Excellent film. Don't know I'd rate it THAT high, but still awesome. (8/10)

JohnErle - Bull Durham - One of Costner's better efforts. Very entertaining. (6/10)

silversurfer - Edward Scissorhands - Been a very long time since I've seen it. (5/10)
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Geezer » February 22nd, 2011, 8:22 pm

numbersix wrote:Interesting, Geez. So do you think there's a point earlier in the film where Ed Norton's character has indeed found a good and successful means of liberation from domesticity (say, the establishment of the fight club) and that if had maintained that and not progessed further Norton would have found satisfaction, or do you think the events going out of control was something that always HAD to happen? I'm not setting anyone up for a disagreement, I just really want to see what the films means to everyone.


I'm pretty sure it is something that always had to happen. I mean, the character isn't exactly what we'd call "sane." I think he needed to "hit rock bottom" to steal a concept from the film, in order to regain some sense of homeostasis.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Ron Burgundy » February 23rd, 2011, 7:52 am

About Fight Club, ive always thought Nortons 'Narrator' slowly loses his marbles but never fully, until he forms the fight club, he starts to get some life back in him, as in he starts to get a hold of his wants, but Durden is almost like his little devil on his shoulder, Helena BC being the angel sorta, and he cant make up his mind until shit gets serious. Its a novel i want to read anyhow
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 23rd, 2011, 1:27 pm

Thread recap:


Shrykespeare
10. Lucky Number Slevin
9. LOTR: The Return of the King
8. Star Trek
7. How to Train Your Dragon
6. The Incredibles
5. V For Vendetta
4. The Dark Knight
3. Star Wars: A New Hope
2. Monty Python and the Holy Grail

silversurfer
10. Jaws
9. The Thing
8. Star Wars: A New Hope
7. Rope
6. Withnail & I
5. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
4. Back to the Future
3. Alien
2. Edward Scissorhands

thegreenarrow
10. Vertigo
9. The Emperor's New Groove
8. My Neighbour Totoro
7. Barton Fink
6. Alice in Wonderland
5. Batman Returns
4. Edward Scissorhands
3. Rear Window
2. Brief Encounter

transformers
10. Kill Bill Vol. I
9. The Boondock Saints
8. The 40-Year-Old Virgin
7. American History X
6. The Departed
5. The Godfather
4. Reservoir Dogs
3. Fight Club
2. Sin City

englishozzy
10. 28 Days Later…
9. Liar Liar
8. Se7en
7. Donnie Darko
6. Serenity
5. Braveheart
4. Toy Story
3. Die Hard
2. The Matrix

Ron Burgundy
10. The Shawshank Redemption
9. Sin City
8. Memento
7. Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy
6. LOTR: The Return of the King
5. Trainspotting
4. L.A. Confidential
3. Pulp Fiction
2. Fight Club

Buscemi
10. Rear Window
9. American Beauty
8. Taxi Driver
7. Pulp Fiction
6. The Silence of the Lambs
5. Memento
4. Wall-E
3. The Godfather
2. Star Wars: A New Hope

Chienfantome
10. Rio Bravo
9. The Bridges of Madison County
8. Dr. Strangelove
7. Once Upon a Time in the West
6. The Host
5. The Lord of the Rings
4. Dances With Wolves
3. Amelie
2. In the Mood For Love

numbersix
10. Taxi Driver
9. His Girl Friday
8. The Battle of Algiers
7. Persona
6. The Third Man
5. Once Upon a Time in the West
4. 2001: A Space Odyssey
3. Vertigo
2. The Big Lebowski

Banks
10. The Dark Knight
9. Reservoir Dogs
8. Boogie Nights
7. Jurassic Park
6. Coming to America
5. The Warriors
4. Rear Window
3. The Matrix
2. The Professional (aka Leon)

BarcaRulz
10. Arlington Rd.
9. Pulp Fiction
8. Fight Club
7. The Shawshank Redemption
6. The Professional (aka Leon)
5. The Dark Knight
4. Der Untergang (Downfall)
3. The Godfather Part II
2. City of God

Geezer
10. Pulp Fiction
9. V For Vendetta
8. Fight Club
7. The Big Lebowski
6. The Blues Brothers
5. The Boondock Saints
4. Star Wars: A New Hope
3. Saving Private Ryan
2. The Dark Knight

leestu
10. The Deer Hunter
9. Midnight Cowboy
8. LOTR: The Two Towers
7. LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring
6. LOTR: The Return of the King
5. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
4. Monty Python and the Life of Brian
3. The Shining
2. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

W
10. Die Hard
9. O Brother Where Art Thou?
8. Independence Day
7. The Hangover
6. La Vita è Bella (Life is Beautiful)
5. Saving Private Ryan
4. Remember the Titans
3. Elf
2. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

NSpan
10. 8½
9. Raiders of the Lost Ark
8. Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back
7. Annie Hall
6. Caddyshack
5. Star Wars: A New Hope
4. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
3. Buffalo '66
2. Brazil

undeadmonkey
10. LOTR: The Return of the King
9. Memoirs of a Geisha
8. POTC: Curse of the Black Pearl
7. Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow
6. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
5. Pride and Prejudice
4. Howl's Moving Castle
3. The Lion King
2. Se7en

JohnErle
10. The Exorcist
9. The Princess Bride
8. The Shining
7. The Breakfast Club
6. Monty Python and the Meaning of Life
5. Edward Scissorhands
4. Almost Famous
3. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
2. Bull Durham
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