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Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

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Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 14th, 2011, 2:14 am

Haven't heard from Ron B in a while. Will have to proceed without him for now.

Let's start the home stretch!


MOVIE #10


Shrykespeare

Lucky Number Slevin (2006)
– Director: Paul McGuigan; starring Josh Hartnett, Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, Ben Kingsley, Lucy Liu and Stanley Tucci. One of the slickest crime thrillers ever created. Still vastly underrated, Slevin follows the travails of a seemingly innocent bystander (Hartnett) who gets caught up in a blood feud between two rival mob bosses (Freeman and Kingsley). Throw in a vicious hitman (Willis), a winsome neighbor (Liu, truly delightful) and a nosy cop (Tucci), and you have one of the most slam-bang casts this side of Ocean’s Eleven. The dialogue is unusually colorful, like something you’d expect to find in a 1950’s potboiler novel, but that gives the movie a rather eccentric flavor that I wasn’t expecting. Neither was I expecting the ending climax, which tied the whole movie together and made it an instant classic in my eyes. I know I said yesterday that Unbreakable was Willis’s best performance, and I stand by that, but of the five films on my list that feature him, this is the highest. (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVIUEcizkPc


silversurfer

Jaws (1975)
- Director: Steven Spielberg; starring Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss. One of the movies which scared the living daylights out of me when I was younger. I can still remember being around six or seven and my mum had returned home on a Saturday evening with out weekly fish and chips for while we watched a rental video. Quickly, we threw the food onto a plate, rammed the video into the player and set ourselves up on the couch (or as usual for me, sit on the floor next to the roaring fire), before that haunting music set in and the now classic opening scene played out. I was stunned, terrified and glued to the screen - the sound of the bhoy ringing almost sounds like a death knell for the young girl who has just been viciously attacked, and you are left unsure of what will follow. Throughout the remainder of the movie I was held remarkably tense by it's fast driven pace, my guts twisting at every moment, all the while the film taps into the most primal of human fears with the minimal revealing of the shark. It's an astonishing movie which has held up so well throughout many dozens of repeat viewings, it's a movie I've continued to seek out over the years and one which you never get tired of. The scares still pack a punch, but I now acknowledge some of the ideas which delve beyond the main plot outline. It's a fantastic test of our own mortality, a brilliant character driven thriller, while the camera work and atmosphere generated show some fantastic ideas for maintaining that tension and uncertainty. It's very rare a movie can remain so thrilling and so unsettling year after year, but Jaws is one of the few that has truly stood the test of time, and I know I'll be sure to be terrified for many years to come. (5th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zkYRD51I34


thegreenarrow

Vertigo (1958)
- Director: Alfred Hitchcock; starring James Stewart, Kim Noval and Barbara Del Geddes. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0bV2gh4E7Y


transformers

Kill Bill Vol.1 (2003) -
Director: Quentin Tarantino; starring Uma Thurman,Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox and David Carradine. Both Kill Bill films are great, but I find the first installment to be much better. The storyline is spectacular. You want The Bride to get vengeance on Bill and the rest of her former assassin partners. Uma Thurman gives The Bride a soul and one top of that, she kicks a whole lot of ass. The action sequences are astonishing. The fight between The Bride and the Crazy 88's is one of the most breathtaking action scenes in movie history. As usual, Tarantino's script is razor-sharp. Another masterpiece from my favorite director. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdjuS17DGlA(Crazy 88's scene)


englishozzy

28 Days Later… (2002)
- Director: Danny Boyle; starring: Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris, Noah Huntley and Brendan Gleeson. Boyle delivers a film which really started to show his true potential as a director. After the somewhat disappointment of The Beach (although I didn’t think it was as bad as people perceived), Boyle reacts with this British zombie movie that challenges the Living Dead series. Some brilliant apocalyptic scenes of London and harrowing performances from Murphy and Harris bring about a real dread when watching this movie. Filmed with a rough edge helps in making you feel that this is probably the more likely situation if mankind ever find themselves fighting off a hoard of rage-driven zombies. The characters inability to be able to use weapons as efficiently as other films always seem to suggest reiterates the fact that they are just average humans just trying to survive. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEkJAaGhJhQ


Ron Burgundy

The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
- Director: Frank Darabont; starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, William Sadler, Clancy Brown and Bob Gunton. Its such an uplifting story, starring Tim Robbins in probably his best performance in his best film, Morgan Freeman in a part where I couldn’t imagine any other man play and a great surrounding cast. The movie just flies by and you can really feel for the characters (good and bad) especially the good feeling at the end. (8th appearance)


Buscemi

Rear Window (1954)
- Director: Alfred Hitchcock; starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter, Wendell Corey and Raymond Burr. Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece. The simple story of a man who spends his time watching his neighbors while recovering from a leg injury would sound boring on paper but thanks to Hitchcock's direction and Stewart's charming performance (yes, Stewart manages to make even a potentially perverted character likeable), the film ends up being one very interesting film. The suspense of Stewart trying to find a killer despite his handicap and limited evidence keeps you wanting more and manages to becomes more engrossing by the minute. Stewart is also complemented by excellent acting from Kelly (as his girlfriend) and Ritter (as his nurse). The film has been imitated, redone and parodied many times (the best being the episode of The Simpsons where Bart breaks his leg and thinks Ned Flanders has killed his wife), but this is still the best version of this premise. (6th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kCcZCMYw38


Chienfantome

Rio Bravo (1959)
– Director: Howard Hawks, starring John Wayne, Dean Martin, Angie Dickinson, Ricky Nelson and Walter Brennan. It was 5 or 6 years ago. The first and only time (for now) I have seen Rio Bravo. It was a restored copy, on a big screen. It was as splendid as if it was new, technically speaking. And it was love at first sight. The kind of love that doesn’t need repeat viewing for confirmation. It was full. It was everything I wanted it to be. It was everything it was supposed to be, and more. For me it’s the greatest “classical” western, but the truth is, it’s nothing classical. On the contrary. Rio Bravo is a very modern take on the genre. It’s not a western about the great landscapes, about riding your horse in the plain, about cowboys and Indians. It’s nothing like that. It’s four men inside a confined place, attacked by outside men outnumbering them. It’s a tense film, alternating between the action and the laughter, the bitterness and the jubilation. It’s a character study disguised as an action film, disguised as a western. Howard Hawks’ greatest strength as a filmmaker was that he could tackle any genre with greatness, and that resonates perfectly with Rio Bravo. A film which structure is so remarkable it has been remade over and over ever since. And not just by John Carpenter. Walter Brennan is one of the greatest comedic supporting actors, and to those of you who wonder why us Frenchies love Dean Martin, watch his turn in this film.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlAF1DPLIAI


numbersix

Taxi Driver (1976)
- Director: Martin Scorsese; starring Robert DeNiro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, and Harvey Keitel. I don’t really think Scorsese is one of my favourite directors (probably because he’s had more misses than hits in the last 20 years) but he sure as hell must be. And while I love the likes of Goodfellas and Raging Bull, this is his ultimate movie. It’s a movie no one else could make, and I’ve seen plenty of pale imitations. DeNiro is brilliantly deluded as some sort of harbinger of justice. But what’s clever about this film is that his sense of morality doesn’t come from religion, or philosophy, or plain logic. It comes from the media, or at least his twisted perspective on it. Scorsese refers to The Searchers, and when I saw Ford’s western not only did the references in Taxi Driver make sense but it kind of improved on what the earlier film was trying to achieve. I won’t get into the comparisons, but Taxi Driver is a twisted take on what it is to be a hero. DeNiro’s character follows what he thinks is right (so much so that he ruins a relationship in the process), wanting to clean up the city and rescue a girl who has become a prostitute. The irony is that he’s as crazy and bloodthirsty as the pimps and dealers, yet after his actions at the film’s disturbing climax he’s actually regarded as a hero! It’s a fantastic movie, with some amazing visuals that represent the clouded, hellish view on life that Bickle possesses. And I have to mention Bernard Hermann’s brilliant score, which references classic noir but seems somehow off, suiting the film’s theme perfectly. (4th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiNx3GWjTgo


Banks

The Dark Knight (2008)
- Director: Christopher Nolan; starring Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart and Gary Oldman. There’s a reason that for a long time after its release, The Dark Knight was voted as the greatest movie of all-time on the IMDb Top 250. And almost three years later, it still sits inside the Top 10 of all-time. And that’s because it is the greatest movie from a director who only makes great movies, and because it contains one of the most powerful performances in cinematic history. Mind-blowing from The Joker’s bank heist to Batman taking the fall for the misdeeds of Harvey Dent, it is the best comic book movie ever and it was great to see such genius rewarded by the masses with an amazing haul of $535 million dollars, even if it was generally ignored by the Oscars. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4tPLDa7c8k


BarcaRulz

Arlington Rd. (1999)
- Director: Mark Pellington; starring Jeff Bridges, Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack. A superb thriller that is criminally underrated. Superb directing, superb acting, and above all; superb script. One of the best endings I have ever seen, and some of the best suspense building techniques I’ve ever encountered. Everyone is at the top of their game, and the end result is a brilliant thriller that both keeps you engrossed and guessing as it plays out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzzT_Iaw0t8


Geezer

Pulp Fiction (1994)
- Director: Quentin Tarantino; starring Samuel L. Jackson, John Travolta, Bruce Willis and Uma Thurman. This has been getting a lot of love lately, and deservedly so. It is Quentin Tarantino's masterpiece. A movie so good, so cool, so worth seeing, that a master of cinema even the likes of Tarantino will probably never be able to top it. It is simply mesmerizing. Every story brings elements to the screen that keep you glued. The dialogue is easily some of the best ever written. A worthy way to kick off my top 10. (8th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDbSbOsoRnY


leestu

The Deer Hunter (1978)
– Director Michael Cimino; starring Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale, John Savage and Meryl Streep. Another one of those powerful movies that I was talking about earlier on that I first watched in my youth and helped me fall in love with watching movies. (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncdlqob1QtM


W

Die Hard (1988)
- Director: John McTiernan; starring: Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman, and Bonnie Bedelia. "You remember when he had to walk across the broken glass, but he wasn't wearing any shoes?" (Yeah.) "That was awesome." -- The Chris Farley Show In my opinion, the best pure action film of all time. It's also comedic with the banter between Hans and John as well as the side characters, my favorite of which is Carl Winslow (err... Sgt. Al Powell). Hans Gruber is one of the greatest villains of all time and no matter how many Harry Potter films there are, Alan Rickman will always be Hans to me. John McClane is the definition of an action hero and though hundreds have tried to make witty cop-like characters that face seemingly insurmountable odds and save the day, he has never been close to duplicated and probably never will. (9th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qxBXm7ZUTM


NSpan

8½ (1963)
- Director: Federico Fellini; starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimee, Sandra Milo and Claudia Cardinale. Remember what I said earlier about Barton Fink? You know, all that jazz regarding "art about art." Well, this is it: the absolute cinematic pinnacle of capturing the creative process. Many movies released before and after were equally ambitious, but no other ever actually *achieved* such heights as Fellini's eighth (and a half) film. Don't call it pretentious--because this film succeeds in EVERY avenue it pursues. Charlie Kaufman's bullshit pale-imitations of this masterpiece have been heralded as works of genius. Bah! If you want the real deal, check this out. (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtDQOF_pU8A


undeadmonkey

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
- Director: Peter Jackson; starring Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen and Ian McKellen. I loved to read when I was younger, from the moment I learned to read to about 16, it would have been very rare to catch me without a book at least an arms length away. As rare as it is to see young boys read these days, the few that do, most come to love the fantasy genre. I know I did. Having one of your favorite books brought to life was incredible; I almost didn’t want to finish the movie, because I didn’t want it to end. (Sounds a bit corny I know, but hey) Again, I loved the books but I always felt that the scouring of the shire scenes at the end was anticlimactic. Yes, seeing the shire go up against and beat Saruman and Wormtongue would have been cool, but like I said, compared to everything that just happened it’s a bit inconsequential. So when I saw Wormtoungue and Saruman die in the beginning of the RotK, I knew Peter Jackson was going to fix that bit. (I didn’t get to see the films in theaters and saw the extended editions first) So many films try to achieve these great cinematical (is that a word..) moments and yet fall flat, but this film is filled with such moments. Gandalf telling Pippin about death and ‘A far green country with a swift sunrise’, Gollum and Frodo’s scene with Shelob (maybe this is just more me, because I am deathly afraid of spiders). Pippin singing his song while Denethor munches away, intercut with the last riders running to their death. Aragorn saying, ‘my friends, you bow to no one’. Charging the Black Gates. Here at the End of All Things. Into to the West….. My favorite scene though is when the hobbits are back in the shire, back at the bar and they are having a drink. No one around them even knows what they went through. They are saying nothing, because nothing was needed to be said. Up till then I had loved everything I had seen, but at that moment I felt I had seen something special, something apart from the books, which allowed the movie to stand on its own. Interestingly though, while that scene lets us in with these friends fellowship and what they went through, it also made me feel like I missed out. That to me is what makes films great, letting us go on an adventure we could never do in real life. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7YllAOqpF4


JohnErle

The Exorcist (1973)
- Director: William Friedkin; starring Ellen Burstyn, Jason Miller, Linda Blair and Max Von Sydow. Horror is one of the hardest genres to pull off, and this is an undisputed masterpiece tapping into primal terrors. I was raised in a Xian household so devils and demons are one of the few movie monsters that can truly terrify me, despite my logical dismissal of all religious beliefs. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDGw1MTEe9k
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby undeadmonkey » February 14th, 2011, 4:02 am

MOVIE #10


Shrykespeare - Lucky Number Slevin (2006)
hmmm, i was expecting this to be even higher ;) . I must say, i really do not like the movie, at all. I was bored, confused (not because of the plot, but why people did certain things). it was just no muy beuno for me. I think there might be a small glimmer of understandness (not a word, i bet) i remember as to why some people could enjoy it, but i certainly couldn't.



silversurfe - Jaws (1975)
totally agree it is one of the most scariest movies out there. I always found it interesting too that most scenes are in daylight. most 'freaky' movies happen at night or in a dark [lace, but if you would shine a light through all those, most come up empty handed. Anyway, this movie is great.


thegreenarrow - Vertigo (1958)
I've only seen it once and while i admit i was underwhelmed, i was expecting a lot more. I did like it though and might be able to appreciate it more with my expectations adjusted.


transformers - Kill Bill Vol.1 (2003) -
oh no, now i'll have to finish the movie.


englishozzy - 28 Days Later… (2002)
and another one joins the club. I really didn't expect this much love from people for this film. but it is great.

i so didn't know Boyle directed The Beach, must of slipped by sometime, i've been on boyle's imdb page often. I kinda liked the beach. Tilda Swinton is very underrated in my opinion.




Chienfantome - Rio Bravo (1959)
I so think i've seen this movie. i'm not one hundred percent sure, as i don't remember, but it looks really familiar. I haven't seen too many westerns myself on my own accord, but every time i went to my grandfathers house, he would have a some classic western on the tv that he was watching. that's where i would of seen it if i have. I will make sure to see it again though.



Banks - The Dark Knight (2008)
fun movie. wow has it really been three years already.



W - Die Hard (1988)
hmmm, Alan Rickman was really good as Gruber, but he owns as Severus Snape. Movie was good, saw it recently based on everyones recommendations. glad i did.






Haven't Seen

i must say, not too shabby of a first round. I wanted to see most of the films already, the few i didn't because i didn't know about them and there is only one film that i don't really care to see, but i will because i said i would. oh yea, and i'll finish that other one too.

Buscemi - Rear Window* (1954)

numbersix - Taxi Driver* (1976)

BarcaRulz - Arlington Rd. (1999) - hadn't even heard of before

Geezer - Pulp Fiction (1994)

leestu - The Deer Hunter* (1978)

NSpan - 8½ (1963) - also hadn't heard of this movie before 6 posted it.

JohnErle - The Exorcist* (1973)
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby numbersix » February 14th, 2011, 4:47 am

MOVIE #10


Shrykespeare: Lucky Number Slevin (2006) – Curse you Shryke for starting the Top 10 with a film I've never seen. The title always put me off and it always looked like one of those style-over-content films. But I'm willing to give it a chance.

silversurfer: Jaws (1975) - A little surprised to see this so high on your list. I can't really flaw it. It's a brilliantly-made, tense film that will make you think twice before swimming in any large body of water. I just feel Spielberg went on to make bigger and better movies. Still love it though.

thegreenarrow: Vertigo (1958) - Fantastic movie from the master. Wonderful music, performance, and visuals, all complimenting one of Hitch's best stories.

transformers: Kill Bill Vol.1 (2003) - Excellent movie (or half a movie). I've neer been so surprised at how much I enjoyed a flick. Amazing sequences all tied together with a distinct style and good dialogue.

englishozzy: 28 Days Later… (2002) - Great, great horror movie. Up there with the best of the zombie films. Love it.

Ron Burgundy

Buscemi: Rear Window (1954) - Well, it was on my list a few days ago so you know I'm going to praise it. Excellent film.

Chienfantome: Rio Bravo (1959) – Another film I haven't seen, and have heard a lot about. Despite having an aversion to John Wayne I know there are some classic Westerns I need to visit.

Banks: The Dark Knight (2008) - And here we go.... this will appear in at least 3 more lists by next week. Loved Ledger's performance though Batman definitely steps into the background a bit. When it comes to summer blockbusters, however, this is a step above the rest.

BarcaRulz: Arlington Rd. (1999) - I remember being somewhat disturbed by this film when i first saw it. Maybe it's Badalamenti's score. A decent film with good performances, although the twist ending feels a little contrived.

Geezer: Pulp Fiction (1994) - Stylish, cool, witty, and undeniably brilliant.

leestu: The Deer Hunter (1978) – Shame to see only you and I pick this so far. It truly is one of the greatest war films I've ever seen. Savage and heart-breaking. What happened to Cimino? Did Heaven's Gate ruin him that much?

W: Die Hard (1988) - I pretty much concur with everything you say. One of, if not the very best action movie of all time.

NSpan: 8½ (1963) - Ah, good to see some Fellini love. It was on my list only 2 days ago. A great film about the creative process, but of course the creative process is merely a metaphor for trying to make sense of life as a whole. At least that's how I see it. Stunning movie.

undeadmonkey: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) - Mayse I was too old, but I was severely disappointed by the books. Overlong, badly paced, full of ramblings and diversions, and an anticlimatic ending. It needed editing. The movies were more succinct and thus far more enjoyable, and you're right, they did fix the ending. Sort of. Wish they didn't have those pointed fade-to-blacks towards the ending, making us think it was over 3 times before it finally was. Also I found the way Shelob moved and acted was a tad too cartoonist to be truly creepy. Minor quibbles for an entertaining finale.

JohnErle: The Exorcist (1973) - A scary and brilliant film about faith and guilt.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby englishozzy » February 14th, 2011, 6:31 am

10

Shryke - The film is called 'The Wrong Man' over here and i have it on DVD, a very good film and would never have thought to put it into this countdown. It kinda slipped under the radar over here and i only picked it up as i had a profound interest in Josh Hartnett's career at the time. 8/10

Surfer - The only reason i am going to mark this down is purely because of the fact i cant remember much about this film. I know i have watched it when i was younger and snippets of it comes to mind but it just reminds me that i really need to sit down and watch this again soon. 7/10

Transformer - Another person that has seperated the two films :O but still good to have at least one part in your countdown :). 8/10

Banks - As one of the three people who had this film on their list i will agree with you that this is an epic film, i still feel though that there is more to come from Nolan. #31 on my list. 8/10

W - The ultimate action film of all time and if anybody second guess' that is a fool, nuff said :). 10/10

UDM - A great film that i need to rewatch more than the single time i have watched it so far. 8/10
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 14th, 2011, 2:02 pm

Movie #10

Banks - The Dark Knight - Coming up soon for me. (10/10)

UDM - LOTR: Return of the King - Coming up soon for me. (10/10)

transformers - Kill Bill Vol. I - My #17, which I obviously love. (10/10)

W - Die Hard - My #25 film, which I also obviously love. (10/10)

Geezer - Pulp Fiction - Very good film. Looks like I'll be one of the few to not have this on my list. (8/10)

englishozzy - 28 Days Later - Same with this one. (8/10)

silversurfer - Jaws - Yeah, Six had it right, this film made me never want to swim in the ocean again. (6/10)

BarcaRulz - Arlington Rd. - Sorry, couldn't stand this film. (4/10)
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby NSpan » February 14th, 2011, 2:59 pm

numbersix wrote:NSpan: 8½ (1963)the creative process is merely a metaphor for trying to make sense of life as a whole. At least that's how I see it. Stunning movie.

well put. you don't have to be an "artist" to understand this film.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Chienfantome » February 14th, 2011, 4:27 pm

#10

Shrykespeare - Lucky Number Slevin (2006)
An enjoyable flick with a twisty scenario and cool actors. Nothing exceptional for me, but a nice watch.

silversurfer - Jaws (1975)
I sometimes wonder if Jaws has something to do with me not being a fan of the big blue. It probably has, yes. It's a great film for the scares, and for its ambitious camera work for the genre. It's far from being my favourite Spielberg, but it'sa good film.

thegreenarrow - Vertigo (1958)
It's a HItchcock I haven't seen in a long time, and one I really need, and want, to rewatch.

transformers - Kill Bill Vol.1 (2003)
THe best half of Kill Bill, definitely. It's a deliciously written action film, full of jubilation for the viewer. One of Tarantino's best, yes.

englishozzy - 28 Days Later… (2002)
Again, I'm not the biggest fan of Boyle, Sunshine being the only film of his (for now, I have yet to see 127 Hours) I genuinely love. But as far as the genre goes, 28 Days is one of the best (but I prefer the sequel I think).

Ron Burgundy

Buscemi - Rear Window (1954)
The only reason Rear Window just missed my Top 100 is because it's one Hitch film I haven't seen in a while. But it's tense, wonderfully directed. A classic well worthy of such a spot.

numbersix - Taxi Driver (1976)
Hmmmm... What you're saying about the references between The Searchers and Taxi Driver is interesting and makes me want to rewatch both films. Taxi Driver, I haven't seen since my teen years. I was a bit too young and did not truly embrace it. But The Searchers, I've seen in theater later, and I was disappointed.

Banks - The Dark Knight (2008)
A truly fascinating film with a lot more to offer cinematographically than most blockbusters. As far as superhero films go, this is probably the best, yes.

BarcaRulz - Arlington Rd. (1999)
Ha ! Interesting choice, Barca. This is a film I very much appreciated when I saw it in theater. It has a Hitchcockian feel that really hooked me. The noir atmosphere is great, and Robbins and Bridges are perfect in their characters.

Geezer - Pulp Fiction (1994)
I abide this pick of your, Geez. An iconic film for a good reason. And a favourite of mine for a good reason too ;)

leestu - The Deer Hunter (1978)
I've only seen it once a few years ago, unfortunately, and it wasn't even in theater. I want to see this on the big screen. And I'm sure this would be much greater in my eyes. For now, my favourite Cimino is Heaven's Gate.

W - Die Hard (1988)
Yay, W, yay ! I could watch this film all the time, I'd still have a blast. The action is great, the humor is cool, the characters are fantastic. One of the best films you have chosen so far my dear ;)

NSpan - 8½ (1963)
Hmmmm... you too... I guess I need to give Fellini another shot with this one too !

undeadmonkey - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
Ana amazing third act of an incredible 9-hour film.

JohnErle - The Exorcist (1973)
As I've said a couple of times already, I'm not a fan of The Exorcist. I've only seen it once, a decade ago, maybe I should give it another go.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 14th, 2011, 5:38 pm

I can now confirm that at least six films will be chosen by 10 out of the 18 people involved here (including JohnL). No way to know which one will be #1 on our combined list.

BTW, I need someone's help.... when I get around to posting our collective Top 100, what is the best way to include the film's poster?
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 15th, 2011, 1:10 am

I added Ron Burgundy's #10 in the post above.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Shrykespeare » February 15th, 2011, 3:32 am

MOVIE #9


Shrykespeare

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
– Director: Peter Jackson; starring Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin, Andy Serkis, Hugo Weaving, Orlando Bloom, John Rhys-Davies, Billy Boyd, Dominic Monaghan, Miranda Otto, Karl Urban, Bernard Hill, David Wenham and John Noble. The ultimate finale to the ultimate literary trilogy. The one that swept the Oscars. The one that topped off a trio of movies based on a literary masterpiece that many once thought was incapable of making a successful transition to the big screen. The one where our heroes show the untapped depths of their courage and sacrifice in the face of overwhelming disaster. The epic saga to end all epic sagas. The one to rule them all. (4th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7YllAOqpF4


silversurfer

The Thing (1982)
- Director: John Carpenter, Starring: Kurt Russell, Wilford Brimley, Keith David, Richard Dysart and Donald Moffat. Along with Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Alien, The Thing was one of the sci-fi horror movies that I grew up with in my pre-teens, horror movies whose concept were supposedly so far removed from reality that my parents didn't really mind me watching (of course all those movies were all too real, playing with a social and political unrest during that period). I would watch that trio of movies over and over again, to the point that I wore the tapes out. They fascinated me, and The Thing in particular was a movie which delighted me with the way it played with isolation and paranoia. The story centers on an American scientific expedition to the frozen wastes of the Antarctic which is interrupted by a group of seemingly mad Norwegians pursuing and attempting to shoot a dog. During the night, the dog mutates and attacks other dogs in the cage and members of the team that investigate. The team soon realizes that an alien life-form with the ability to take over other bodies is on the loose and they don't know who may already have been taken over. Carpenter utilizes the snowy, cold and cramped setting to amazing effect, really pressing home the claustrophobic atmosphere and building up the sinister tension to dramatic effect. But beyond that, the movie is further enhanced by a supremely witty and inventive script, a fantastic cast who really are all-too-real, and some special effects which still put CGI to shame even almost 30 years later. I watched the movie again a couple of months ago and it still scares the bejeezus out of me, and beyond the obviously brilliant 'blood test' moment, that final scene is stunning, you really don't know who (if any) of the survivors are who they say they are.... (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouZkkIsLiNg


thegreenarrow

The Emperor's New Groove (2000)
- Director: Mark Dindal; starring: David Spade, John Goodman and Eartha Kitt. This is a movie which always makes me laugh. At a time when Disney seemed to be producing poor movie after poor movie, this came out of nowhere. It was so fresh and unique with such a clever and witty concept, taking the buddy movie and regenerating it for the new millennium. The characters are delightfully hilarious, the songs are lacking (whew!) and the pace is phenomenal. Yzma and Kronk are absolutely brilliant bad guys, both totally incompetent with slapstick like many a Wile E. Coyote cartoon. And who didn't want spinach puffs after watching this! Endlessly hilarious, it's a Disney which has remained fresh and fun to watch over numerous viewings, now if they could only prove that this wasn't a fluke.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_YjSbp5KHM


transformers

The Boondock Saints (1999)
- Director: Troy Duffy; starring Sean Patrick Flanery, Norman Reedus, Wilem Dafoe and Billy Connolly. The Boondock Saints is the ultimate cult movie and I completely understand why. It's basically the epitome of cool in movie form. It's a bad-ass, insanely quotable and brilliantly engaging crime film. The McManus brothers are two of the most memorable characters in a long time, they are religiously charged antiheroes that kill criminals. Willem Dafoe steals the show as the homosexual police officer in pursuit of the Boondock Saints, I don't think he has ever been better in his career. A slick, amazing, funny and bad-ass crime thriller. (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKzM8xsQ5-U
(the infamous courtroom scene)


englishozzy

Liar Liar (1997)
- Director: Tom Shadyac - Stars: Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney, Justin Cooper and Cary Elwes. This film being in the Top 10 of my all-time favorite films just shows you how powerful a film can be when you watch it for the first time. Although nowhere near the most technically gifted film I have ever watched but it’s a film that will always make me laugh when I really need to. Probably the one of the few films I can watch time and time again without it being too much. Carrey is on top form with his comic nonsense as he spends most of the time making the most out of his inability-to-lie situation. I will probably get ridiculed by you guys for having this film here but at the end of the day we are making a list of OUR Top 100 films aren't we?? (2nd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0DA75eOltA


Ron Burgundy

Sin City (2005)
- Directors: Frank Miller, Robert Rodriguez & Quentin Tarantino; starring Jessica Alba, Alexis Bledel, Powers Boothe, Rosario Dawson, Benicio Del Toro, Michael Clarke Duncan, Carla Gugino, Josh Hartnett, Rutger Hauer, Nicky Katt, Jamie King, Michael Madsen, Brittany Murphy, Clive Owen, Mickey Rourke, Nick Stahl, Bruce Willis and Elijah Wood. I am one of those that are still waiting for Sin City 2, and I was as soon as I left the cinema when I watched this. Mickey Rourke is in perfect form here, Bruce Willis and Clive Owen certainly maintain that quality, and not to mention a dozen other famous faces who deliver the goods too, I love big casts. The 3 point of views story is one of those you can watch any time every time, it has such a cartoonish feel, with over the top violence and wise cracking dialogue. Sin City 2 is way past due, though sometimes I feel there is no way it can keep up to this standard. (6th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwIlEu7o9ZM


Buscemi

American Beauty (1999)
- Director: Sam Mendes; starring Kevin Spacey, Annette Bening, Thora Birch, Chris Cooper and Wes Bentley. Possibly the best film about the often-done premise of insanity in suburbia. Sam Mendes (in his directorial debut) manages to create an interesting world of Anytown, USA and him and screenwriter Alan Ball create one of the most memorable characters in cinema history in the role of Lester Burnham. Excellently played by Kevin Spacey (once winning a well-deserved Oscar here), he is the type of guy that you kind of wish you were (well, give or take a few things). Annette Bening is also great as his demanding and sometimes outright mean wife. The B-plot of the film, involving Birch and the neighbors, seems to get made fun of a lot but I feel that it is as good of a plot as the A-plot. Also, I feel that this film had one of the most effective and surprising downer endings I've ever seen. I won't tell anyone in case someone hasn't seen it yet. Anyways, a great film and one that deserved Best Picture despite some people complaining that it didn't deserve it. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChzaLc4rS04


Chienfantome

The Bridges of Madison County (1995)
– Director : Clint Eastwood, starring Meryl Streep, Clint Eastwood and Annie Corley. I don’t know how much bashing I’m gonna get for this one. I wonder. But I am certain of my love for The Bridges of Madison County. It’s not always been like that. I remember when it was released in theater, my mom wanted to take me to see it. “Hell no, I’m not gonna see this chick flick!”. Then when it was released on video: “Hell no mom, I’m not gonna rent this chick flick”. But when, a couple of years later, it was on TV, I gave the film a chance. I was what, maybe 17, or 18. “Ok mom, let’s watch this Clint film”. I expected to hate it. But to my very shame, I fell in love with it. I got carried away by the most beautiful love story I had ever witnessed. In the 90’s, upon the death of their mother, two brother and sister discover in their late mothers stuff that during the summer of ’65, she lived four days of passion with a man who wasn’t their father. I cried all the tears of my body. I did. I did not stop at one viewing that surprised me. I’ve bought the DVD and watched it a few times since. I wanted to see beyond the emotion. And what I have always found, at each viewing, was a beautiful film. A film that deals with grieving. A film that deals with passion. A film that deals with renouncement. A film that says four days of happiness can fill a lifetime of regret. No, The Bridges of Madison County is not a chick flick. Yes, Clint Eastwood can make an immense film out of a melodrama. His best film.

There’s no trailer or clip valuable on youtube, but I found an acceptable trailer for it on dailymotion : http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8qvpf_sur-la-route-de-madison-bande-annon_shortfilms


numbersix

His Girl Friday (1940)
- Director: Howard Hawks; starring Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy, and Gene Lockhart. They say they don’t make ‘em like they used to. And this would certainly be proof of that (well almost. There’s a comedy coming up that’s even better). But what I think they might mean by that phrase is the priority of dialogue in a film, especially when it comes to comedy. To put it simply, His Girl Friday has the greatest comedy dialogue I’ve ever heard. And the pace is almost breathtaking. The joke-per-second ratio is stunning. The only comparison I can think of is the films of the Marx Brothers but they were essentially plot-less. This film not only has the jokes, but it has the story as well. It was a rather progressive film, pitting a battle of the sexes in the “man’s world” of the newspaper office, and having us sympathize with the leading lady. Rosalind Russell dominates with her powerful performance as Hildy, who wants to get out of the cut-throat game of reporting and settle down, but she’s always dragged back into it. She’s supported (and I mean supported) by Cary Grant as the charming/slimy editor who is attracted to and professionally needs Hildy’s talent. The zippy film takes in gender roles, political corruption, media menace, and mass hysteria, all in 92 minutes. It never gets old, it never gets tired, and it never stops being funny. (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJVCQTd6DTI


Banks

Reservoir Dogs (1992)
- Director: Quentin Tarantino; starring Michael Madsen, Steve Busemi, Tim Roth and Harvey Keitel. Tarantino’s best script and movie to date, in my opinion. His twisted conversations on “Like A Virgin” and on the societal implications of tipping waitresses are stuff of legend – where an irrestible script meets immense direction. His choices to not show the heist in a heist movie is a ballsy move, even moreso when you remember that this was his first film. And a film that is cast perfectly, a film that takes left-field actors of the day and makes them the stars. Filled to the brim with memorable lines – “You shoot me in a dream, you better wake up and apologize” – and memorable scenes – the ear cutting, Reservoir Dogs is not something that any film fan should miss. And when you think about it, tipping really is a crock. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyR4RK0LA_E


BarcaRulz

Pulp Fiction (1994)
– Director: Quentin Tarantino; starring Samuel L. Jackson, John Travolta, Bruce Willis, Uma Thurman and Ving Rhames. (9th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDbSbOsoRnY


Geezer

V for Vendetta (2006)
- Director: James McTiegue; starring: Hugo Weaving, Natalie Portman, John Hurt, Stephen Rea, and Rupert Graves. This movie is only so LOW on my list because I simply haven't seen it in quite a while. It’s been in my top five from the very first time I saw it. When the credits rolled on the first time I watched it in theaters, I turned to my brother and simply stated "that could be the best movie ever made." It still stands in my top 10, and I doubt it would ever fall out. I only haven't watched it in a while because my other brother took my DVD, let someone else borrow it, and I never got it back. I recently re-bought it but haven't had time to watch it yet. The message is just so strong, and the performances are even stronger. It has everything I look for in a movie and its just perfect. I get chills every single time I hear that final speech. (7th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNd7ZOMScJ8


leestu

Midnight Cowboy (1969)
– Director John Schlesinger; starring Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Sylvia Miles and Brenda Vaccaro. I do like when a movie has the power to affect you emotionally even though you know it’s just a story, and this movie gets me very time. I can’t even listen to “Everybody’s Talkin” by Fred Beil without thinking of this movie and feeling sad again. Dustin Hoffman as Ratso Rizzo is right up there as one of my favourite acting performances ever. On a side note, I quite like that the movie that won the Best Picture Oscar for the year I was born is one of my ten favourite movies ever. Unfortunately for my oldest son it was Titanic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnFoaj8utio


W

O Brother Where Art Thou? (2000)
- Directors: The Coen Brothers; starring George Clooney, John Turturro and Tim Blake Nelson. A take on Homer's epic The Oddysey transplanting the Depression-Era South for Ancient Greece/Troy and a smooth talking con man who leads a bluegrass/country band for Odysseus. It sounds a just a little like gay cowboys eating pudding, but really it ended up being one of the best and most hilarious comedies I've ever seen. I'm not normally a fan of Clooney, but he is masterful as the "Dapper Dan Man," Ulysses Everett T. McGill. His compadres Pete and Delmar bring probably the biggest laughs of the film delivering lines like "We though you was a tooooooaaad." and pretty much every facial expression of theirs is comedic gold. I also like how they updated the "ob-stac-les" (like Pete said) like the women in the river as sirens and John Goodman as Big Dan (the cyclops). And the music... How did it not get nominated for an Oscar at all? I'm not an expert on the Oscar rules, but shouldn't it have gotten at least a nomination for "Man of Constant Sorrow"? (3rd appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1C2gCXo4Gs


NSpan

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
– Director: Steven Spielberg; starring Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, John Rhys-Davies and Paul Freeman. (6th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YXw7BxYGMU


undeadmonkey

Memoirs of a Geisha (2005)
- Director: Rob Marshall; starring Ziyi Zhang, Ken Watanabe and Michelle Yeoh. Admittedly I might have a small crush on Gong Li, but that is not why I love this film. Gong Li, Michelle Yeoh and Ziyi Zhang give fantastic performances as well as the little girl playing young Sayuri, some of the best acting I have ever seen. Rob Marshall’s direction is flawless. The sets, costume design and cinematography are exquisite. The Snow Dance scene is so beautiful and completely encapsulates what the film and Sayuri’s story is about, it is one of my top 5 favorites scenes ever. This film is also one of the first that got me interested in films of other cultures, it is very rare for Hollywood to make films about different cultures, but I craved more. So that got me interested into looking into local film business in other countries as they obviously have a better grasp on what their cultures are/were like and I have not been disappointed. I’m not expecting any love for this film, as I’m sure most of you will see this as some kind of chick flick. (Another upcoming movie could be seen that way too). To me though, it’s so much more, its about a little girl who was abandoned for money, treated as a servant all her life and found a way to break free using only what she had. A beautiful and entrancing story about betrayal, love, growing up and taking your life into your own hands.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsBIVfenPMg


JohnErle

The Princess Bride (1987)
– Director: Rob Reiner; starring Cary Elwes, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin and Billy Crystal. Combines the humour of Monty Python, the fantasy of Tolkien, and lots of genuine emotion. The Inigo Montoya story is probably the greatest sub-plot in movie history. (6th appearance)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njZBYfNpWoE


#100 on the combined list is now Sunshine.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby undeadmonkey » February 15th, 2011, 4:12 am

MOVIE #9


Shrykespeare - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
hah, why didn't i think of using 'the one to rule them all' line yesterday. Great movie


thegreenarrow - The Emperor's New Groove (2000)
wow, it's been so long since i've seen this movie. I did remember liking it. I just don't like it as much as the other disney animated films.


Ron Burgundy - Sin City (2005)
one of the handful of movies i hate. Seen it twice too. ugh.


Buscemi - American Beauty (1999)
Sam Mendes is a great director. I was just a little disappointed in the movie, which i think was more about my high expectations. As everyone had always told me it was a modern classic, so i was expecting something great, but what i got was something good. Maybe someday when i see it again, i'll like it bettrer.


numbersix - His Girl Friday (1940)
I just recently saw this on account of it being on Surfer's list. I liked it, i liked it a lot actually. I just would need to get a lot more out of it than i did to ever put it in my top 10. Maybe with repeat viewings my appreciation might grow, like other classic movies. Again, i liked it just guess i didn't find it quite as funny as you.


Geezer - V for Vendetta (2006)
i had this in my 60s or somewhere around there. I really like it too. The ending speech was alright, but my favorite was his first speech with all the V's, blows me away every time. Hugo Weaving should of won some kind of award for that.


NSpan - Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
nice, choice, i enjoyed the whole franchise.



JohnErle - The Princess Bride (1987)
yes, it is. great choice, erle. another one that i've seen. which makes two in a row, i don't think that's happened so far.



I hope Sunshine stays in the top 100, it deserves it....


Haven't Seen


silversurfer - The Thing (1982) - i was planning on just seeing the remake but i guess that's not going to happen now ;)

transformers - The Boondock Saints (1999)

englishozzy - Liar Liar (1997) - color me surprised. not a huge carrey fan, but i won't be dreading seeing this.

Chienfantome - The Bridges of Madison County (1995)

Banks - Reservoir Dogs (1992) - hmmm, another tarinto film i have to see, wonder if all will show up by the end.... although i doubt it's going to happen, you could really pat yourself on the back if i turn out a fan of him by the time this is over, i've tended to stay away from his films.

BarcaRulz - Pulp Fiction (1994)

leestu - Midnight Cowboy (1969)

W - O Brother Where Art Thou?* (2000)


that makes 14 films i have to see so far from the top ten. Some i'm really looking forward to, others, erm, not so much.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby numbersix » February 15th, 2011, 4:42 am

Wow... a lot of movies I haven't seen in this round...

MOVIE #9

Shrykespeare: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) – I prefer the first part, as there's a few issues in this one, but it's nevertheless a satisfactory ending to an enjoyable trilogy.

silversurfer: The Thing (1982) - Brilliant film, some amazingly tense scenes, and characters that feel real enough to make you worry about them. Needless to say I'm not looking forward to the prequel (honestly, what's the point?).

thegreenarrow: The Emperor's New Groove (2000) - Haven't seen it, it kinda looks like part of the decline of Disney, though.

transformers: The Boondock Saints (1999) - Ah, i should have known this would appear. Quite the cult movie over there, completely unknown over here. Holy shit those accents are awful, are they supposed to be Irish? It doesn't help that it was the butt of a joke in The Office recently.

englishozzy: Liar Liar (1997) - Haven't seen it.

Ron Burgundy: Sin City (2005) - Great atmosphere.

Buscemi: American Beauty (1999) - Meh, it's okay. It's a little pretentious, especially when it assembles a bunch of cliches and tries to make it profound. I was never enamoured by Spacey's performance, it kinda felt as if he was just delivering each line with utmost sarcasm and I never felt he was the character. Compare that performance to his in The Usual Suspects or Seven and for me they're far better.

Chienfantome: The Bridges of Madison County (1995) – You and I have a lot of common taste in films, but this time it's you and my mother who have the similarities ;). Haven't seen it, and you know how I feel about Clint.

Banks: Reservoir Dogs (1992) - A great, intense heist film.

BarcaRulz: Pulp Fiction (1994) – If this film was our collective Top 1 I'd be a happy man. One of my favourites.

Geezer: V for Vendetta (2006) - If this was in our collective Top 10 I'd be an unhappy man ;) Reverse everything you said about it and you'll come to my conclusion!

leestu: Midnight Cowboy (1969) – A contender for my list. You're the only one to pick it? A shame, because it's a brilliant film. Difficult at times, endearing at others, with a wonderful, sad ending. It kind of prefaced the style and content of a lot of great films in the 70's.

W: O Brother Where Art Thou? (2000) - As a regualr movie it's pretty good. As a Coens movie it's sub-par.

NSpan: Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) – Undeniably fun.

undeadmonkey: Memoirs of a Geisha (2005) - Being a fan of Japanese culture (and Ziyi Zhang) I wanted to see this. But the critics were all underwhelmed and from what I'm told the production design is about the only good thing about it.

JohnErle: The Princess Bride (1987) – A wonderful fantasy that I really need to watch again.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby NSpan » February 15th, 2011, 6:07 am

9 Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) - Directed by Steven Spielberg - Written by Lawrence Kasdan

Another brilliantly-inspired script by Lawrence Kasdan--but I have to admit: the real magic here comes from Spielberg's direction, John Williams' score, and Douglas Slocombe cinematography. Everything came together for this production. When I watch it, I am entranced. Teleported to another world. Suspension-of-disbelief is a lacking term when discussing Raiders. I hate to give away even more of my Top 5 than I already have... but this isn't my favorite Indiana Jones movie. The climactic scene (opening the ark) isn't *quite* as climactic for me now as it was when I was a kid. Though, I do still love the wide-shot of the ark being filed away in government warehouse. Karen Allen, by the way, is the PERFECT love-interest / sidekick. PS. I fucking HATE Temple of Doom. In my mind, "Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis" rounds out the trilogy. You can download it from Steam.com--and I expect it to, eventually, get a release (as a download) on for PS3 and X-Box 360.
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Ron Burgundy » February 15th, 2011, 8:40 am

MOVIE #9


Shrykespeare
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King - I wont argue with this selection at this stage, as it appears on my list too, though even higher up, great pick.

silversurfer
The Thing - Was finally able to scratch this one off my list last year, it was a blast. Kurt Russell is terrific and the Thing is so freakin creepy. A good sci-fi thriller.

thegreenarrow
The Emperor's New Groove - Im actually a little surprised that some1 has only just picked this now, and cant believe that its a first selection, because Kronk is pretty much one of the funniest henchmen ever and Kuzco is a very good character to, how he changes his style ahem groove.

transformers
The Boondock Saints - First time i saw this, i thought it was a little bit budget, but seeing it later really gave me a new impression, i thought it was fun and pretty cool.

englishozzy
Liar Liar - It used to be my fav film, but it has really sunk down the order in recent years, dont know if it was the sappyness or the jokes that lost their 'smell' but i do own it and should give it another shot one day soon, even though ive probably seen this over 5 times.

Buscemi
American Beauty - I secretly predicated you would choose this boosh, but well here it is. I dont mind this best picture winner, it has Mena Suvari, a very weird pair of neighbours and an extremely perhaps over the top sarcastic Kevin Spacey, but you know what, i can actually see some surburbia in the US being like this ;)

Chienfantome
The Bridges of Madison County - Chien did someone cut off your balls or something? ;) Just kidding, i promise ill watch this once i get a girl, but not before.

numbersix
His Girl Friday - Already on my Must See list

Banks
Reservoir Dogs - Its on my list so yeah, no complaints here :D

BarcaRulz
Pulp Fiction - Very wise decision to include it in your top 10, it might just be our no. 1.

Geezer
V for Vendetta - Wow, so we meet again V....as i said earlier, i have only seen this once, so it deserves to be re-watched....very soon

leestu
Midnight Cowboy - The reason why i watched this was because i heard how good Hoffmans Ratso Rizzo was, but i came away thinking he was pretty much matched by Voights character. A little hard to digest at times but totally worth the watch. You always seem to pick films that elude my memory, apart from this Once Were Warriors is probably in my top 100 but i forgot about :oops:

W
O Brother Where Art Thou? - Very entertaining, a yeah i dig that song too.

NSpan
Raiders of the Lost Ark - Excellent Intro and Outro, and some riveting action.

undeadmonkey
Memoirs of a Geisha - Well, it now goes on the list.

JohnErle
The Princess Bride - Saw it the other day thanks to Shrykes selection, and yeah i agree that the Inigo Montoya subplot is pretty sweet. Cary Elwes shines and i really love that Wallace Shawn battle of the wits. Good movie
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Re: Fantaverse Top 100 Movies of All Time (Thread #10): 10-2

Postby Chienfantome » February 15th, 2011, 7:46 pm

#9

Shryke - LOTR : The Return of the King
A fantastic last chapter to a riveting 9-hour film.

Surfer - The Thing
I still have to see that Carpenter film that tempts me for ages !

greenarrow - The Emperor's new groove
I'm astonished by that choice of yours greenarrow. Really ??!! It was a forgettable Disney for me.

transformers - The Boondock Saints
It was only ever released on dvd in France, and had you guys not talked about it so much, it would have never caught my attention. I have yet to see it (and I'm very cautious about it...)

Ozzy - Liar Liar
Oh no. Oooooh noooooo. I love Carrey, but this is watchable at best.

Ron B - Sin City
It had been a while since we last discussed this one. A great noir hommage with lots of style.

Buscemi - American Beauty
A good film. I love the melancholy of it. It did not stay much with me over the years, but it's good. Despite my feeling that Spacey is a vastly overrated actor most of the time.

Six - His Girl Friday
Hmmm... I have a little idea concerning the comedy you rate even higher... We'll see ;) Anyway, I'm a Hawks lover, even though mine of his in my Top 10 is a western, I absolutely love His Girl Friday, which I strongly considered for my Top 100. I still ended up with Bringing up Baby in i.

Banks - Reservoir Dogs
Tarantino started his career with a slick bang. A great film deserving of all the lvoe it's got.

Barca - Pulp Fiction
One of my favourite too Barca. Tarantino's best, from the dialogues to the editing and music use, it's all perfect. It would make a great collective #1 indeed.

Geezer - V for Vendetta
Now that would make a pretty lame collective #1 in comparison, so fingers crossed ;) (sorry, but I was really disappointed by this).

leestu - Midnight Cowboy
Interesting choice leestu, and a most certainly good film. I have only seen it once on TV more than a decade ago though. Funny trivia : do you know what's the title in France ? "Macadam Cowboy".

W - O Brother where art thou ?
A fun Coen film, quite crazy and delicious sometimes, a bit minor overall.

NSpan - Raiders of the Lost Ark
Has anyone cited Temple of Doom ? (Raiders was in my Top, so yes, NSpan, I love it too !)

UDM - Memoirs of a Geisha
There is so much things I want to say about your choice and your text, UDM, but let's keep it short. First, Memoirs of a Geisha ? Nooooo, no no. And not just because I think Rob Marshall is a terrible director (I haven't liked anything he's done). Using Chinese actresses to portray the Japanese is obviously a big problem with the film (and making it all in english too, probably). Please, if you crave for foreign cultures, watch foreign films, and not Hollywood films trying to make something about a foreign culture they show their own bad way.
Now, you are now officially "my maaaan" as would say Denzel Washington, by admitting you have a small crush on Gong Li. That is proof of great taste, at least in women ;) I have a small crush on her myself (oh come on, who am I fooling, the crush is huuuge).

Erle
A fantastic tale of my childhood which never gets old. The characters are all smoothly crafted, the dialogues and storytelling are great. I love it.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Chienfantome
The Terminator
 
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